UK v American

Some grammar rules (and embarrassing mistakes!) transcend the uniqueness of different regions and style guides. This new International Grammar section by OnlineBookClub.org ultimately identifies those rules thus providing a simple, flexible rule-set, respecting the differences between regions and style guides. You can feel free to ask general questions about spelling and grammar. You can also provide example sentences for other members to proofread and inform you of any grammar mistakes.
User avatar
Helen_Combe
Posts: 2483
Joined: 18 Feb 2018, 12:17
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 150
2017 Reading Goal: 0
Favorite Book: The Martian
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 193
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-helen-combe.html
Latest Review: And The Trees Began To Move by Lisa Gammon Olson
Reading Device: B00M4L4MFC

Re: UK v American

Post by Helen_Combe »

Crainbow wrote:
27 Jul 2018, 13:29
So, Which English is standard for writing reviews here? American or British? For instance, emphasise or emphasize?
I’m English and I write British English. You write whichever one is natural to you.
A thesaurus is necessary, essential, indispensable, vital, crucial and fundamental.

User avatar
CatInTheHat
Previous Member of the Month
Posts: 2732
Joined: 31 May 2016, 11:53
2019 Reading Goal: 75
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 32
Favorite Book: Cry the Beloved Country
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 502
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-catinthehat.html
Latest Review: Two Wrongs by Anthony L. Baker
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU
Publishing Contest Votes: 0

Post by CatInTheHat »

Crainbow wrote:
27 Jul 2018, 13:29
So, Which English is standard for writing reviews here? American or British? For instance, emphasise or emphasize?
British spelling is fine. Note that although most of the American editors are probably familiar with common British words, they aren't necessarily with all, so you might have to request a recheck if you get marked off for one (and it would change your score, don't do a recheck for spelling if it won't change your score).
Life without a good book is something the CatInTheHat cannot imagine.

User avatar
Crainbow
Posts: 19
Joined: 09 Feb 2018, 18:17
2018 Reading Goal: 24
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 4
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 28
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-crainbow.html
Latest Review: From Drift to SHIFT by Jody B. Miller

Post by Crainbow »

CatInTheHat wrote:
27 Jul 2018, 14:56
Crainbow wrote:
27 Jul 2018, 13:29
So, Which English is standard for writing reviews here? American or British? For instance, emphasise or emphasize?
British spelling is fine. Note that although most of the American editors are probably familiar with common British words, they aren't necessarily with all, so you might have to request a recheck if you get marked off for one (and it would change your score, don't do a recheck for spelling if it won't change your score).
Right. Thank you for your helpful reply.

User avatar
xian20
Posts: 2
Joined: 30 Jul 2018, 09:30
Bookshelf Size: 0

Post by xian20 »

British or American. In ordinary way of writing we tend to used American English because it is widely applied and known by more individual, but using British English do not make big changes as long as it is acknowledge in your place.

User avatar
a9436
Posts: 248
Joined: 07 Jul 2018, 13:18
2019 Reading Goal: 12
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 16
Currently Reading: Winning the War on Cancer
Bookshelf Size: 80
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-a9436.html
Latest Review: First Family by Alice Langholt

Post by a9436 »

Biscuits still catches me out - there is always a split second in which I imagine the horror of custard creams with gravy until I realise I am reading American English!

User avatar
Helen_Combe
Posts: 2483
Joined: 18 Feb 2018, 12:17
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 150
2017 Reading Goal: 0
Favorite Book: The Martian
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 193
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-helen-combe.html
Latest Review: And The Trees Began To Move by Lisa Gammon Olson
Reading Device: B00M4L4MFC

Post by Helen_Combe »

I've found a great disambiguation for UK v US biscuits

In the UK, a cookie is a soft, squishy, moist biscuit (for lack of a better word). ... A British biscuit is an American cookie and an American cookie is a British cookie and an American biscuit is a British scone and an American scone is something else entirely.

I had to look up biscuits and gravy. It looks pretty horrific anyway.
A thesaurus is necessary, essential, indispensable, vital, crucial and fundamental.

Post Reply

Return to “International Grammar”