Danish and English

Some grammar rules (and embarrassing mistakes!) transcend the uniqueness of different regions and style guides. This new International Grammar section by OnlineBookClub.org ultimately identifies those rules thus providing a simple, flexible rule-set, respecting the differences between regions and style guides. You can feel free to ask general questions about spelling and grammar. You can also provide example sentences for other members to proofread and inform you of any grammar mistakes.
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Ubissen
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Danish and English

Post by Ubissen »

I am bilaungual in Danish and English, so if you need help with anything in Danish or a translation from or to either language please let me know.

Ulla

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demetria
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Post by demetria »

Maybe you can shed light on something that was puzzling me, though I think it was mostly in Swedish crime novels that I came across it, not Danish ones. Perhaps the word is suffiiciently similar in Danish. For a while I read, translated to English, a lot of the 'dark Scandinavian' crime novels. In some of them the detectives and others kept slurping their tea or coffee. They did not sip it, or drink it, or take mouthfuls of it, they slurped it. I don't remember coming across this in non-crime Scandinavian fiction, though I have read less of that. I got fed up with them slurping every hot drink they had. Different translators were involved. Is this something to do with stereotypes of the police in Scandinavian countries, or is there an issue with the translation of a word for taking mouthfuls of a drink into English? An odd question perhaps, but it was so frequent as to be irritating.

ameliahulse
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Post by ameliahulse »

Thank you for your help.

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lbhatters
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Post by lbhatters »

demetria wrote:
03 Nov 2016, 20:22
Maybe you can shed light on something that was puzzling me, though I think it was mostly in Swedish crime novels that I came across it, not Danish ones. Perhaps the word is suffiiciently similar in Danish. For a while I read, translated to English, a lot of the 'dark Scandinavian' crime novels. In some of them the detectives and others kept slurping their tea or coffee. They did not sip it, or drink it, or take mouthfuls of it, they slurped it. I don't remember coming across this in non-crime Scandinavian fiction, though I have read less of that. I got fed up with them slurping every hot drink they had. Different translators were involved. Is this something to do with stereotypes of the police in Scandinavian countries, or is there an issue with the translation of a word for taking mouthfuls of a drink into English? An odd question perhaps, but it was so frequent as to be irritating.

I lived a fourth of my life in foreign countries. People slurp their drinks on purpose as a form of politeness, actually. It is a cultural sign which means that the drink / soup is delicious. It was likely not a translation problem or the specific action of the authorities.
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