Do you read aloud to older children?

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Janet Bragg
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Re: Do you read aloud to older children?

Post by Janet Bragg » 07 Aug 2018, 20:17

Reading aloud to older children is still important. First of all, older children love to listen to their teachers read to them. Fluency struggles are still factors in older readers, and hearing a fluent reader increases comprehension in these students. I serve in a jail ministry and often hear these women read. Adults still love to hear a fluent reader, one who reads with expression and places the punctuation in the read.

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Post by Realsy » 27 Aug 2018, 11:54

My mother would read the same books as I was all through high school (although not reading aloud) so that we could discuss them. I found it helped me retain the information and do better on the tests. Now a mom myself, I intend to do the same. My son is now 11 and still enjoys being read to every evening. I think its a good form of bonding since its spending time together and helps keeps communication open since you have something to share/talk about.

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Post by ObsessedBookNerd » 31 Aug 2018, 09:49

My younger sister is 12 years old & hates reading the only time she will get through a book is if someone reads it out loud for her.

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Post by slori0488 » 03 Sep 2018, 01:51

I think it's definitely important to continue reading to or with older kids. Chapter books, a newspaper (I still read newspapers), or even an eBook or online news. Someone mentioned this in another post, but it does help teach pronunciation, proper flow, spelling, definitions, gives confidence/self-esteem etc. At some point they're at least going to have a job interview. It's important to feel confident speaking to others and using words correctly.

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Post by Italiansweety1982 » 06 Sep 2018, 17:07

My son is 5 and I plan to always keep reading to him. We have "reading time" every night. Sometimes he reads to me. My thoughts right now are that when he gets older we can take turns or find books that peak his interest more for his age. I saved all of my Harry Potter books for him!

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Post by MsLisa » 19 Sep 2018, 15:55

I definitely think you should read to older children. My youngest sibling who is around the age you mentioned where the decline in reading happens can't be trusted to actually read a book cover to cover. The only way I get them even the slightest bit willing to read is to read aloud with them.

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Post by gfowle » 23 Sep 2018, 12:09

I certainly think that this is important, and reading aloud can be easily adapted to fit into the routines of older children. For example, I think that the ages between 8 and 13 are a great time to read more complex books out loud together. Children at this age do not want to feel like they are still being treated like young children, but at the same time, they will still appreciate the chance to get one-on-one attention from a parent.

This could also be a way to broach more difficult topics with children at this age, such as bullying, sex, discrimination, etc. Literature is a powerful tool.

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Post by LaurenHaupt » 29 Sep 2018, 00:08

I read to my nine year old. She's a little behind on reading so we take turns with each other.
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Post by Jsovermyer » 13 Oct 2018, 22:03

I read to my daughter when she was little and she loved it. Around the age of 8, she wanted to read by herself. My husband, daughter, and I would sit in the livingroom together, each reading our own book. She still loves to read today and is a Kindergarten teacher teaching her students to read.

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Post by psspcj » 10 Nov 2018, 18:37

I do read to my kid. In this technology age where children prefer to glue themselves on mobile screen, I believe this is better way to teach them good things and keep occupied.

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Post by Ak1412 » 05 Feb 2019, 22:47

I believe that no matter how old the child is, if they want to be read to aloud then the adult should agree to do so. Of course this is within reason. They should still work to improve their independent reading skills. However, if the child finds joy and comfort in listening to an adult read, don't deny them that blessing. It can even help them to love reading more later in life.

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Post by Ak1412 » 05 Feb 2019, 22:49

Jsovermyer wrote:
13 Oct 2018, 22:03
I read to my daughter when she was little and she loved it. Around the age of 8, she wanted to read by herself. My husband, daughter, and I would sit in the livingroom together, each reading our own book. She still loves to read today and is a Kindergarten teacher teaching her students to read.
This is so great that you modeled reading so well for your daughter and now she gets to model reading for children as well.

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Post by EllieLieberman » 12 Mar 2019, 00:23

I remember teachers reading out loud to the class well into 8th grade. It was always a much enjoyed activity.

There are also many benefits older children can still gain in listening to someone else read a story. To state an obvious one, listening skills, as well as focus and concentration. It, also, enhances a variety of skills they might not be using when they read the words on the page or that some readers may still be struggling with, such as flow and comprehension.

The books at this age also become more complex, often showing more than telling. Emotions and social cues becomes more subtle and reading out loud can help children not only navigate these cues in the writing itself, but also help them identify it in their everyday life. It's the difference between, "'I guess so,' he said sadly" and "'I guess so,' he said in a quiet voice, wiping his nose with the back of his hand." Again, this help with comprehension.

Reading out loud to any kid at any age can also help the kid connect, not only to the person reading to them, but also to the book itself. Suddenly, it's not just random words on a page. And, suddenly, it's not just a boring assignment. Suddenly, it has flow and it has life and it's real. Suddenly, it's fun and they can get into it without any real pressure. I definitely see a correlation between kids enjoyment and kids being read to, especially at later ages.

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Post by Renu G » 23 Mar 2019, 03:34

I would encourage older children to read a book at bedtime instead of listening to a story.

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Post by Dragonsend » 13 Apr 2019, 17:10

Absolutely, funny you should ask, so many older children READ on phones, tablets and computers that I believe spending time reading out loud to each other is a good activity for quality time. Hope the technology age doesn't deprive older children of this family activety.
The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance. 2 Peter 3:9 :angelic-grayflying:

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