Ender's Game

Discuss the April 2013 book of the month "Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card
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lady_charlie
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Ender's Game

Post by lady_charlie »

We liked this book so much.
We can't wait for the movie to come out.
I read this book because the people here said it was good.
My daughter read it, and then she read the next one, and now she is reading the next one.
She tells me all about them.
It is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay. J.R.R. Tolkien
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Kermit21
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Post by Kermit21 »

I loved this book and have read all the books in this series. Orson Scott Card is such a great author. I have liked every book written by this author. The whole concept and the way it was presented was riveting! I was on the edge of my chair the whole book. I became so attached to Ender that I started reading Bean's story just to hear more about them. It will be really hard for the movie to top this book.

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Post by sandraev »

I really enjoyed this book; and I didn't think I would but I did. LitLovers discussion question 2: "Is childhood a right? Does a person robbed of a "normal" childhood have any possibility of stability as an adult? Does Ender have any chance of living "happily ever after"?"

Does anybody have any thoughts or insights on this? I think everyone has a right to a childhood to have time to learn and grow up but those who don't have a normal childhood can still grow into stable responsible adults. I also think it'll end up being more work for them as love and logic is hard to learn on your own. As to the last question I've already read the series so I better not answer.

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lady_charlie
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Post by lady_charlie »

I have been thinking about this, too, especially since I also recently read Beyond The Beautiful Forevers. Is childhood different when you are poor or well off? Does boarding school change a person forever?

Sadly, childhood is not a right and I think lots of children don't get one. And then, what is a normal childhood?

There are people who criticize our home where fantasy and imagination have their place beside the reality of finances and gravity. Santa Claus, elves, wizards, and a rabbit who delivers candy and eggs once a year have all been welcome here, and people say to me that it isn't healthy or good. They make snide remarks about how I am hoping to create "the magic of childhood".

Being poor doesn't mean you don't have love, either, or dedication or loyalty, but the children I read about in Beyond The Beautiful Forevers were so poor that there really was no hope beyond the hope of finding a bit of food for the next meal. Education was out of the question for many of them, and sorting garbage was a good job for the ambitious who wanted more out of life.

I think Ender has a good chance of meeting someone and falling in love, and being "happy" in spite of his childhood and odd family. I haven't read the rest of the books, but I think he knows the difference between right and wrong and he will grow up and do what he can to make things right again.
There are some very wealthy children who are probably separated from home very early to go to boarding schools, which seem to start around age 11, but I also found this:

Many mothers would have broken down in tears if their child had asked them, aged five, if they could become a boarder at their school. Author and journalist Anna Pasternak saw her daughter Daisy’s request to board as a sign of her independence and maturity, and allowed her to start boarding on Wednesday nights when she was six.

Daisy, now eight, enjoys a glorified sleepover while still getting help with her homework.
It is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay. J.R.R. Tolkien
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Post by adeleduran »

I enjoyed reading Scott Card anytime. This story spoke to me in that my childhood had elements of this story. Good Story.

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Post by cmiller38 »

Hi I am new here and read this book recently and loved it after reading this book i read all other books in the series one after the other. I don't want to spoil anything for anyone but these books all ask pertinent philosophical questions. These books address so many diverse philosophical questions that I wondered if books 1, 2 and 3 in the series may have been written by different authors.

As to the questions above by lady charlie and sandraev on what constitutes a normal childhood and if being poor or rich effects this? These issues are dealt with continually throughout the series and more in depth later in the series in Beans stories particularly the poverty side in "Enders Shadow".

As for my opinion on the matter you give them love and teach them right from wrong and hope for the best. I also have a belief that there is too much sadness and hardship on the world so try and shield/protect them as much at home as possible and I like lady charlie have always indulged in fun and fantasy with my kids/grandkids knowing they will learn the harsh reality outside the home and will be there to support them when they need it.

I don't know about anyone else but this has worked out well for me my kids have grown in to good responsible adults (not perfect but good enough) and my grandson loves coming to my house and when he is here he spends most of his time with me playing and giving all the love i have shown him back ten fold.

Wow that all sounds much more soppy than I intended for my first post. Look forward to reading the books of the month and participating more often

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Post by lucyrebecca123 »

Sounds like one for the list :)

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Post by mackonopacky »

What a great book, and thought provoking series. I read this book shortly after it came out and was blown away by the end of the book. Over the years, I have followed the entire series and enjoyed each book (I still want a speaker for the dead when I die lol), but my favorite of all the books in this series is Enders Shadow. Bean's story was the most moving for me.

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Post by gali »

I have read the book and loved it. I didn't watch the movie. I didn't continue to the rest of the books in the series.
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Post by JemmyB »

My friend lent me Ender's Game while I was waiting for him in the car. I finished it that day. A quicker read, you get immersed in Ender's life. I loved how it started, with such a beautiful ending the picture it painted was phenomenal.

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Post by Shil »

I liked this book so much I immediately got to the sequel in the series.

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Post by lbradley18 »

I loved this book. Ender and Bean were such strong characters. I was a little skeptical at first mainly because I wasn't much of a science fiction reader, but this book definitely got me into it.

-- 03 Dec 2013, 23:37 --

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Post by sarabeara »

i read a few pages of the enders game and i didn't really understand the story so i dropped that book!

-- 23 Dec 2013, 18:10 --

anyone please explain?????

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Post by scubagabriella »

This is my all-time favorite book. When I was in 6th grade my teacher made us read it for an assignment and ever since then it's been the best book I've ever read. Ender's story is so moving and it pulls you right in until you can't put the book down. I recommend it to every person who asks me if I know of a good book they should read. Even if you don't enjoy science fiction the theme really resonates with you.

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Post by samanthaeh76 »

mackonopacky wrote:What a great book, and thought provoking series. I read this book shortly after it came out and was blown away by the end of the book. Over the years, I have followed the entire series and enjoyed each book (I still want a speaker for the dead when I die lol), but my favorite of all the books in this series is Enders Shadow. Bean's story was the most moving for me.
I absolutely agree. I read Ender's Game when I was a child and have loved the series ever since. I have a younger brother who is highly intelligent and used to beat me severely in chess. I thought he would do very well in Battle School!

I loved the development of the series and the maturing level of philosophy and morality in each one. My favorite was Shadow of the Hegemon. I always wanted Bean's story to be expanded and I was absolutely thrilled when his series came out.
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