Official Review: The Curse of Moses and Mohammad, Book 3 ...

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mmm17
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Official Review: The Curse of Moses and Mohammad, Book 3 ...

Post by mmm17 » 21 Oct 2019, 10:34

[Following is an official OnlineBookClub.org review of "The Curse of Moses and Mohammad, Book 3 of 4" by Kalki Rameses.]
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2 out of 4 stars
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The Curse of Moses and Mohammad is the third book of a series of four, written by Kalki Rameses, who was born in a farming community in India. While growing up as a Hindu, he did not have to follow a specific religious book. When the author emigrated to Canada, he married a Catholic woman and came to admire Jesus’ message of love and compassion. In this book, Rameses aims to show how the Torah and the Koran lack this benevolent message.

The central aspect of this non-fiction title is the author’s analysis of religious dogmas and holy books, especially the Koran. One of its core arguments is that the Koran propagates hate and violence against people of all other religious faiths, and it should be banned. The author urges non-Arab countries to rediscover their ancient religions and cultures. He strongly opposes the division of India that resulted in the creation of Pakistan, an Islamic republic whose name means land of the pure.

What I liked most about this book is that it is remarkably educational. Rameses describes Arab history in great detail. I knew very little about the Muslim faith and the Koran before reading it. The author thoroughly describes the life of Mohammad and how Islam got shaped by him. Rameses examines Mohammad’s African heritage and how he was a former slave. Many suras (chapters) from the Koran get presented and commented by the author throughout the book. I was surprised to learn that the Koran mentions Moses, Mary, and Jesus several times.

On the other hand, I disliked the somewhat aggressive manner in which the author expressed his controversial opinions. I’m sure his heart is in the right place, but some claims felt exaggerated. For instance, he believes that all free countries should pass laws banning the Koran and the construction of mosques. He also states that “the Torah and Moses are an insult to anything Jesus stood for.”

In closing, I rate this book 2 out of 4 stars. The formatting of the Kindle edition needs improvement. There were numerous instances of sentences that got split in the middle, and these errors interrupted the flow. I also found many grammatical mishaps. Although most weren’t serious (unnecessary capitalizations), the sheer number of them distracted me. For this reason, and above all, for the overly aggressive tone, I’m deducting two stars from the rating. Still, open-minded readers interested in religion and seeking to understand Islam might like this book.

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The Curse of Moses and Mohammad, Book 3 of 4
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Post by Magnify3 » 23 Oct 2019, 07:10

Wow! I agree that the author is a bit extreme when he says "the Torah and Moses are an insult to anything Jesus stood for." I can't speak for the Koran as I have never read it. Thanks for the review!

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Post by mmm17 » 23 Oct 2019, 09:23

Magnify3 wrote:
23 Oct 2019, 07:10
Wow! I agree that the author is a bit extreme when he says "the Torah and Moses are an insult to anything Jesus stood for." I can't speak for the Koran as I have never read it. Thanks for the review!
Yep! I felt the same. Still, it is a good read.

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Post by Wyland » 24 Oct 2019, 06:20

It seems like an interesting book discussing on two major personalities of faith. I also think the aggressive tone of the author is unnecessary. This would hardly attract anyone to read. He should realize the power of being silent and meek. Thanks for the wonderful review.

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Post by Dentarthurdent » 24 Oct 2019, 11:59

The book sounds incredibly informative and insightful, so it's quite a shame about its extremely subjective tone. Good job on the review!
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Post by mmm17 » 24 Oct 2019, 13:42

Wyland wrote:
24 Oct 2019, 06:20
It seems like an interesting book discussing on two major personalities of faith. I also think the aggressive tone of the author is unnecessary. This would hardly attract anyone to read. He should realize the power of being silent and meek. Thanks for the wonderful review.
I agree! I also believe in the power of being silent and meek. Thanks for your comments!

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Post by mmm17 » 24 Oct 2019, 13:43

Dentarthurdent wrote:
24 Oct 2019, 11:59
The book sounds incredibly informative and insightful, so it's quite a shame about its extremely subjective tone. Good job on the review!
It is an informative and insightful book. Thank you for commenting!

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Post by Iber3 » 25 Oct 2019, 11:28

Anything or anyone speaking about the facts, that the Old Testament, in all truth, has no actual connection to Jesus Christ, a Greek man from Tyana, should be read with a most potent interest, since it is quite important to mention, that Apollonius of Tyana was the true person behind the invention of Biblical Jesus, and when spoken in conjunction with Moses and Mohammed, and how the Nature and Religious aspect of Jesus/Apollonius was and is completely Opposite to the Religious views of Abrahamic, Moses and Mohammed Faiths, then, it is most clear, this book is a light in the darkness that must be reached for. I will definitely seek this book out and read it.

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Post by kdstrack » 02 Nov 2019, 10:27

I agree that many would read this book simply to educate themselves on these teachings. You did a great job of analyzing this author's premises!

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Post by bigirimanacelestin » 13 Nov 2019, 07:11

Those two, Torah and Koran present more incredible aspects in them, but the problem is that more believe in them without reading. This book is worthy to be read. Nice review
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Post by Nisha Ward » 29 Nov 2019, 23:54

While there is great value in the author's examination, having lived in a country where most Muslims who follow the Koran are actually quite peaceful, I would have to pass up on it.
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