Which classics may fall out of favor in the future?

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Crystal_Lynn
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Re: Which classics may fall out of favor in the future?

Post by Crystal_Lynn » 16 Apr 2019, 20:11

I don't want any of the classics to "fizzle" out. It isn't about what you agree with, that is the problem we are having with education now. It's about the classical wording, and interesting stories with fascinating adjectives and imagination. A lot of the literature and reading has been watered down today because of political, socialist type conforming and it puts everyone's creativity in a box.

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Post by flaming_quills » 17 Apr 2019, 02:50

I think classics that carry discriminatory measures like The Merchant of Venice which has very anti-semitic messages. If I'm not wrong, it's already falling out of favour.

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Post by srividyag1 » 17 Apr 2019, 09:47

smmoore2025 wrote:
25 May 2018, 10:46
Winne-the-Pooh by A.A. Milne

The intresting thing about this topic is not only are adult classics becoming obsolete, but children classics are as well. All over schools are banning books we once read. Claiming they premote bad behavor or insulting something or another. Banning books like The Giving Tree (Shel Silverstein), Anne Frank's Diary (Anne Frank) and Winnie-the-Pooh (A.A Milne) is a shame. How can they ban Winnie-the-Pooh for being considered an insult to god. I remember reading these books and never being able to put them down. They provide imagination and adventure for young minds and shouldnt be banned because one miniscule detail may seem offensive to one. Then dont read it. Children reading these books dont realize those details, all they care about is the wonderdul jounrey their taken on.
Winnie the pooh is a wonderful book. I used to love the cartoons when I was a kid. Then I read this book called Tao of Pooh, and realised that even adults have a lot to learn from Pooh and piglet. I cannot even imagine that anyone would want to ban these books and deny our kids the enjoyment we gained from these wonderful characters. That makes me really sad.
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Post by srividyag1 » 17 Apr 2019, 09:53

Crystal_Lynn wrote:
16 Apr 2019, 20:11
I don't want any of the classics to "fizzle" out. It isn't about what you agree with, that is the problem we are having with education now. It's about the classical wording, and interesting stories with fascinating adjectives and imagination. A lot of the literature and reading has been watered down today because of political, socialist type conforming and it puts everyone's creativity in a box.
Yes, the sentences in classics were constructed beautifully. They used to be long and complex, yet amazingly poignant and elegant. I noticed this difference for the first time when we had to read The Count of Monte Cristo in high school. My textbook was an abridged version. Then I read the long version with 500+ pages from the library and I enjoyed it immensely. I actually felt disappointed that the education system was giving a watered down version of this amazing classic and my friends who never read the complete version would never get to know the beauty of Dumas' words. Today, everyone relies on Cliff Notes. Who reads Shakespeare and Dante in their original form anymore? One section of the reading spectrum is left to lament in this manner, while the other section reads "Fifty Shades of Grey" and calls themselves avid readers.
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Post by srividyag1 » 17 Apr 2019, 09:59

Vscholz wrote:
10 Aug 2018, 21:35
With the current consumption rate of information, many books will fall out of favor. The attention span of audiences (with exception of visual media, such as movies and TV shows) is extremely limited. The limitations of text-speak, imposed by limited texts allowed to send in the past or created through a desire for a quicker way of communication, have contributed to this issue.

There's a book about classic characters joining Facebook. It is something like "Ophelia joined the group Maidens Who Like to Drown" and is rather humorous. However, even though it was published this century (maybe 15 years ago at most), the format has taken off and become even more condensed. You can see evidence of how people imagine characters would interact on social media thanks to many many many Tumblr users.
That is an interesting observation and example. I had never heard of such a book. so I googled it. It is Ophelia Joined the Group Maidens Who Don't Float: Classic Lit Signs on to Facebook by Sarah Schmelling . It is a depressing fact that in today's "280 characters" world, classics with 500 pages or above considered as tomes are soon to be obsolete.
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Post by Nisha Ward » 20 Apr 2019, 01:22

I think most classics are going to fade out over time as the years pass. Mostly only academics read them now, which is a shame because there's some interesting stuff in there waiting to be found.
"...while a book has got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the reader it's got to be worthwhile from the point of view of the writer as well." - Terry Pratchett on The Last Continent and his writing.

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Post by VAwkOb12 » 03 May 2019, 06:26

I absolutely think Shakespeare won't be popular in the future. The language in his books is difficult and who even uses words like those. No one has time to be looking up the meaning of old words. Just be direct and to the point.

Pride and the prejudice also needs to be written in an easier language so we don't have to read it four times to get the full picture. Emphasis on simple, spoken and current english.

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Post by iced_sunshine » 10 Jun 2019, 08:55

I think works like Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice will fall out of favour soon (or already are) because of the strong opinions they have that are no longer held by the public (in this case anti-semitism).

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Post by coffeeteal » 15 Jun 2019, 03:07

Well, there are bad books at all times. I would like it if only the bad books disappear over time. But since they are bad, most of them didn't make it big and are forgotten already. As for classics, I wish they are read for the pleasure of it and to know about the times thousand years ago and the writer's language during those times. Classics should always be read to enjoy and learn about the good old times.

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Post by coffeeteal » 15 Jun 2019, 11:42

I have a feeling that fairy tale classics have already started fading out.

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Post by RoxieReads » 29 Jul 2019, 11:11

pricklypurple wrote:
30 Jun 2018, 16:14
Unfortunately, I think Shakespeare will fade out with time because it is essentially written in a language we don't speak anymore. So, unless it is updated, kids generations from now will not be able to understand it at all.
Maybe Shakespeare should be rewritten? It seems like such a bizarre idea to me.
~Roxie~

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Post by RoxieReads » 29 Jul 2019, 11:11

coffeeteal wrote:
15 Jun 2019, 11:42
I have a feeling that fairy tale classics have already started fading out.
Yes, maybe, but they are being rewritten in new and creative ways.
~Roxie~

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Post by ShannonNinja » 01 Aug 2019, 08:18

It’s hard for me to say what books I think will disappear. Classics are part of our history. History doesn’t fizzle out. We keep reading about it and growing from it and I think the same will happen with Classics. Just because they are no longer relevant to our time doesn’t necessarily mean they won’t be read. The generations to come will read Classics as a way to look back into different time periods.

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