Which classics may fall out of favor in the future?

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Brittany J
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Which classics may fall out of favor in the future?

Post by Brittany J » 25 May 2018, 09:22

Classics are supposed to be timeless, but as time goes on, do you think some of the them will become obsolete as classics? I imagine eventually some will become replaced with modern classics. Which ones do you think will become irrelevant or no longer required reading?

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Post by smmoore2025 » 25 May 2018, 10:46

Winne-the-Pooh by A.A. Milne

The intresting thing about this topic is not only are adult classics becoming obsolete, but children classics are as well. All over schools are banning books we once read. Claiming they premote bad behavor or insulting something or another. Banning books like The Giving Tree (Shel Silverstein), Anne Frank's Diary (Anne Frank) and Winnie-the-Pooh (A.A Milne) is a shame. How can they ban Winnie-the-Pooh for being considered an insult to god. I remember reading these books and never being able to put them down. They provide imagination and adventure for young minds and shouldnt be banned because one miniscule detail may seem offensive to one. Then dont read it. Children reading these books dont realize those details, all they care about is the wonderdul jounrey their taken on.

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Post by Brittany J » 26 May 2018, 02:26

That's such a shame. I loved The Giving Tree and Winnie the Pooh as a kid. I had no idea these were banned some places.

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Post by gkgurley » 29 May 2018, 11:36

I think we'll see Gone With the Wind disappear. The romanticism of the South is (and needs to) end, and as well written as the book is, there are a lot of problems. The movie is what has kept it in view because so many schools and classes have stopped teaching the book, but once fewer people see it and Rhett Butler isn't quoted as often, I think we'll see it fizzle out.

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Post by Dael Reader » 11 Jun 2018, 20:22

gkgurley wrote:
29 May 2018, 11:36
I think we'll see Gone With the Wind disappear. The romanticism of the South is (and needs to) end, and as well written as the book is, there are a lot of problems. The movie is what has kept it in view because so many schools and classes have stopped teaching the book, but once fewer people see it and Rhett Butler isn't quoted as often, I think we'll see it fizzle out.
I agree. And won't miss it when it fizzles.

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Post by Dael Reader » 11 Jun 2018, 20:25

I feel like Moby Dick should be on its way out. The only people I know who think it's worthwhile are the English profs who teach it.

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Post by Serena_Charlotte » 19 Jun 2018, 12:19

I definitely think that Nathaniel Hawthorne's work and most other religiously-oriented novels like his will eventually become obsolete. He had a much different audience back then. These days, enough people have read the novel and applied it to themselves that the novel itself is unnecessary.
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Post by Lil Reads » 25 Jun 2018, 18:32

Dael Reader wrote:
11 Jun 2018, 20:22
gkgurley wrote:
29 May 2018, 11:36
I think we'll see Gone With the Wind disappear. The romanticism of the South is (and needs to) end, and as well written as the book is, there are a lot of problems. The movie is what has kept it in view because so many schools and classes have stopped teaching the book, but once fewer people see it and Rhett Butler isn't quoted as often, I think we'll see it fizzle out.
I agree. And won't miss it when it fizzles.
I hope that happens soon. Replace it with The Wind Done Gone that is the story retold from Scarlett's half-sister and focuses on the perspective of the slaves. Still on my TBR pile, but I cannot wait to get it.
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Post by bclayton13 » 26 Jun 2018, 19:30

gkgurley wrote:
29 May 2018, 11:36
I think we'll see Gone With the Wind disappear. The romanticism of the South is (and needs to) end, and as well written as the book is, there are a lot of problems. The movie is what has kept it in view because so many schools and classes have stopped teaching the book, but once fewer people see it and Rhett Butler isn't quoted as often, I think we'll see it fizzle out.
I agree, the book definitely painted a rosy picture of slavery in its heyday. And if I remember correctly, the book's treatment of freed slaves got much worse when the story entered the reformation era. If it is remembered, I hope it's remembered for that. If not, then that's for the best.

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Post by bclayton13 » 26 Jun 2018, 19:31

Lil Reads wrote:
25 Jun 2018, 18:32
Dael Reader wrote:
11 Jun 2018, 20:22
gkgurley wrote:
29 May 2018, 11:36
I think we'll see Gone With the Wind disappear. The romanticism of the South is (and needs to) end, and as well written as the book is, there are a lot of problems. The movie is what has kept it in view because so many schools and classes have stopped teaching the book, but once fewer people see it and Rhett Butler isn't quoted as often, I think we'll see it fizzle out.
I've never heard of this book! I'm adding it to my "to read" list right now.
I agree. And won't miss it when it fizzles.
I hope that happens soon. Replace it with The Wind Done Gone that is the story retold from Scarlett's half-sister and focuses on the perspective of the slaves. Still on my TBR pile, but I cannot wait to get it.

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Post by bclayton13 » 26 Jun 2018, 19:33

Dael Reader wrote:
11 Jun 2018, 20:25
I feel like Moby Dick should be on its way out. The only people I know who think it's worthwhile are the English profs who teach it.
My answer was going to be Moby Dick. Again and again I keep hearing how people despise it, myself included.

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Post by pricklypurple » 30 Jun 2018, 16:14

Unfortunately, I think Shakespeare will fade out with time because it is essentially written in a language we don't speak anymore. So, unless it is updated, kids generations from now will not be able to understand it at all.

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Post by Vscholz » 10 Aug 2018, 21:35

With the current consumption rate of information, many books will fall out of favor. The attention span of audiences (with exception of visual media, such as movies and TV shows) is extremely limited. The limitations of text-speak, imposed by limited texts allowed to send in the past or created through a desire for a quicker way of communication, have contributed to this issue.

There's a book about classic characters joining Facebook. It is something like "Ophelia joined the group Maidens Who Like to Drown" and is rather humorous. However, even though it was published this century (maybe 15 years ago at most), the format has taken off and become even more condensed. You can see evidence of how people imagine characters would interact on social media thanks to many many many Tumblr users.
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Post by jesscat304 » 14 Feb 2019, 17:17

I can understand why people would think that Shakespeare will fade out, but thankfully there are some versions that have the normal English text besides the Shakespearan so hopefully that will not be the case.

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Post by Tessa23Darling » 17 Mar 2019, 19:36

I'm thinking the "Scarlet Letter" will no longer be a classic if it hasn't been removed from that list already. Considering it's about a woman who had a child out of wedlock and I know 6 friends who had their child before marriage, I'm thinking that book would be considered offensive by many.

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