Recommendations of Classic Books

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CCoop1983
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Re: Recommendations of Classic Books

Post by CCoop1983 » 13 Jun 2018, 01:12

One my all time favorite classic books is 'Pride and Prejudice' by Jane Austen. Elizabeth Bennet is by far one of the most beautifully written characters of all time. Mr. Darcy is so very layered and flawed in a way that makes him stick with you well after you have finished reading. The plot is very simple yet so masterfully done. Only Austen can make a story of five daughters seeking marriage a timeless work of art. It's hard to imagine that anyone who is a reader has not already read it. But, if you haven't, please be kind to yourself and get lost in this absolutely captivating love story.

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_ayshaaaa_
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Post by _ayshaaaa_ » 21 Jun 2018, 15:15

CCoop1983 wrote:
13 Jun 2018, 01:12
One my all time favorite classic books is 'Pride and Prejudice' by Jane Austen. Elizabeth Bennet is by far one of the most beautifully written characters of all time. Mr. Darcy is so very layered and flawed in a way that makes him stick with you well after you have finished reading. The plot is very simple yet so masterfully done. Only Austen can make a story of five daughters seeking marriage a timeless work of art. It's hard to imagine that anyone who is a reader has not already read it. But, if you haven't, please be kind to yourself and get lost in this absolutely captivating love story.
That's all the encouragement I need! I recently read Emma and still can't get over Austen's writing.
I currently own Persuasion, so still looking forward to owning a copy of Pride and Prejudice.

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Post by geekprincess26 » 26 Jun 2018, 19:46

I'll add another vote for Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities. It's fabulously detailed historical fiction rich with drama, tragedy, desperation, disappointment, sorrow, love, and hope. Since it's (a) a Dickens novel (b) set during the French Revolution, it is dark, heavy, thoughtful, and not for the faint of heart, but Dickens's humanization of one of the most horrific periods in European history through his focus on the struggles and tragic legacy of the Evremonde/Darnay family is more than worth the tears you'll spill. He spends so much time weaving the tale of that legacy, in fact, that Charles Darnay and Lucie Manette, the book's nominal protagonists, are perhaps the work's weakest characters. The novel's strength - and certainly this reader's sympathy - lie in peripheral characters like Dr. Manette and Miss Pross, and even the villains, Monsieur and Madame Defarge, the latter of whom one almost hates to hate after discovering her backstory. And Sydney Carton, introduced as the novel's ne'er-do-well antihero, is peeled back layer by layer throughout the book, slowly metamorphosing into its heart and soul. Of course, Dickens articulates his usual thread of social commentary, but it's woven so brilliantly into the characters and the story that they very nearly eclipse it. Five out of five stars, and my favorite 19th-century novel by far.

My 20th-century favorite is C.S. Lewis's Till We Have Faces, a symphony of mythology and philosophy blended into a heartrending retelling of the Greek myth of Cupid and Psyche. The tale is narrated (with surprising sensitivity for a male author, I might add) by Orual, queen of Glome and Psyche's eldest sister, who is part villain of the tale, part reluctant witness, and yet a thoroughly sympathetic figure to any reader who was neglected by his or her parents in childhood in favor of his or her prettier, more accomplished sibling. Orual's father spends most of her childhood alternately abusing her, ignoring her, and wishing she had been born a boy. Despite the preference of nearly everyone around them for Psyche, Orual loves her little sister and nearly goes mad with pain and rage when their father, the king, sends Psyche off to be sacrificed to the gods to end a famine. However, when Orual goes to the altar outside the city to collect her sister's bones, she finds Psyche alive, well, and claiming to be the bride of one of the gods. Orual, thinking her sister insane, refuses to believe her until Psyche can prove her "husband" exists. That proof takes the form of the one act that can break the truce between Psyche and the gods, who banish her to wander in the wilderness until she can accomplish the impossible feats (think Herculean labors) that will reconcile her with her husband. Orual returns to Glome, broken and doomed to a life without her sister. She spends the rest of her life trying to absolve herself of guilt and raging against the gods for her fate. As a symbol of her guilt, she wears a veil over her face, only removing it as an old woman when she embarks on one last quest to find her sister and hold the gods accountable for their ill treatment of her. It's a mythic, intimate, raw, and devastating meditation on hatred, love, doubt, and redemption. Through Orual, Lewis probes the deepest struggles, longings, hopes, and limits of the human heart and its perception of the divine with a brilliance that will grab at your heart and not let go. I still tear up when I think of this book, and I read it well over a year ago.

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Britty01
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Post by Britty01 » 05 Jul 2018, 09:26

The Mythwriter wrote:
15 Aug 2009, 00:17
Everyone has at least heard of "A Tale of Two Cities" by Charles Dickens, but I'm always surprised by how few seem to enjoy it. I'll admit that its true that the the plot, or rather plots, are very numerous and seemingly disjointed; yet the way they weave together in the end is simply genius, and I would think any who complain that plot lines are too linear these days would get their fix for life from this book.

Sydney Carton is definitely one of the most profound characters I know. A life of perpetual disappoint would lead so many to choose so differently, and especially when they could have benefited from it like he could have. But when he makes his final choice... not only giving his life a final purpose, but to define the height of true love and nobility, brings out the best of humanity we all hope actually exists in us.

This book will forever be one of my favorites... I wish I could talk about it for pages, but no one would read the post, haha! But the best way is to read it yourself.
I am slowly working my way through Charles Dickens novels, Little Dorrit is my favorite. At the moment, I am working my way through 'Hard Times'. I like them because they are a little complex and they make the reader think.

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Post by Zack19c » 12 Jul 2018, 12:06

I'd recommend Marry Shelly's Frakenstein, it's considered an all time favorite by science fiction and horror writers. For those who don't know, it's a story about a man who creates a monster in an attempt to cure death and create life. However, it's more complex than you think. Victor Frakenstein is fairly selfish and self-centered character. The monster on the other hand, while it did do some evil actions, is a tragic figure who's lonely and has nowhere to go. Either way, it's a great read and has earned its place as a classic.

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Post by Zack19c » 17 Jul 2018, 12:26

Another book I'd like to recommend is of Mice and Men. It's a story about two down on their luck men in the great depression trying to find a job when trouble strikes. It has a positive depiction of a disabled character, very compelling character drama, shows that the American dream isn't all that it's thought to be, and has one of the saddest endings of a story. You grow to like Lenny even if he's not the brightest person and you'll feel sorry for him through out the story. George is a great character too who has sympathetic moments and is amusing because of his grumpy attitude. Overall, it's an entertaining book.

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Post by JaneHeathcliff » 18 Jul 2018, 15:52

One of my favourite classic novels is Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen and it's such an amazing book that leaves me breathless every time I read it.

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Post by Ak1412 » 23 Jul 2018, 17:58

I definitely reccomend The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. This is definitely one of my favorites to read. I find the journeys of young Huck to be rather interesting. I'd say it's the most entertaining classic I have read but of course it also contains profound teaching on basic love towards others and can serve as a reality check of human kindness for many.

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Ak1412
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Post by Ak1412 » 23 Jul 2018, 18:02

I would not recommend Lord of the Flies. While the book does contain obvious literary value it drags on and bored me completely. It seems as though the author could have said everything that was said in the book within a short story.

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Post by xBibliobibulix » 24 Jul 2018, 20:01

Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded by Samuel Richardson is incredible and was the first book that gained kind of a cult following with actual merch being made. I read in in a college British Lit class and had a friend who actually wrote her thesis on it comparing the actions of Pamela to current selfie culture. I would definitely recommend this one as a thoughtful read.
"There are people who read too much: bibliobibuli. . .They wander through this most diverting and stimulating of worlds in a haze, seeing nothing and hearing nothing." -H. L. Mencken

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Post by Mohammedliman80 » 02 Aug 2018, 08:36

Frankenstein (Mary Shelley), classic and great written novel.

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Post by blossomjin » 15 Aug 2018, 21:47

I'm not sure if this is an unpopular opinion but I found The Great Gatsby hard to get through. I didn't have to read it for school and I felt let down because so many people love it. I mean it must be a classic for a reason. I need to reread it for my masters so I may soon so I may change my mind.

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Post by oogies » 16 Aug 2018, 08:11

imstilljoeypotter wrote:
27 Feb 2010, 22:36
I loved A Tale of Two Cities! It's a beautiful story.

To previous poster, you're not alone in your love for Emma. I loved all of Jane Austen's novels, but I think my favorite is still Pride and Prejudice. Elizabeth Bennett is the perfect heroine IMO.
I am currently still reading a tale of two cities and thus far I love it! I am an old romantic at heart so the likes of Charles Dickens and Jane Austen really appeals to me. I can re-read their novels 100 times over. These books make the dreamer in me unable to function normally for days after I have finished a novel.

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Post by swlly » 19 Aug 2018, 16:48

Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen. It’s about two sisters and finding out the difference between sense and sensibility and it teaches a lot about money and true happiness!

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Post by bluesky5_ » 24 Aug 2018, 20:51

How about the classic, "Moby Dick?" and the Nancy Drew series as well as the Hardy Boys. Of a very important and interesting story I found out something really surprising. In 1983 in Oregon a story was written that really changed my thinking of what the worst crime in life is...the "Diana Downs story" published in 1983. It was later a movie with Farrah Fawcett playing Diana and that movie was called "Small Sacrifices". Of the 3 children she attempted to murder 2 survived and are living private lives and were adopted by the detective on the case. Later as Diana was convicted to jail for life + 50 she entered into jail, pregnant. She gave birth to a girl who was also adopted and raised into a stable and loving family. Then around October 22, 2010 Oprah Winfrey did a talk show about the girl who grew up and learned who her mother is...a book that is called "When Your Own Mother is a Notorious Killer." A must read for me, I didn't know this book existed.

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