A Tale of Two Cities

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Khushi
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Re: A Tale of Two Cities

Post by Khushi » 19 Apr 2015, 11:09

This is one of the most well-written book I have ever read. Charles Dickens is my favourite author. And 'A Tale of Two Cities' is a classic and a masterpiece in the truest sense. I read it for the simple joy of reading something so well-written. A historical novel with interwoven plot of a love story set in the tragedy and horror of the times of the revolution, makes for a spell binding plot. But what is even more impressive is the skilful manner in which the book is written. The language is not difficult, it is rich. An English you are familiar with yet don't use so often. I rarely reread it in a stretch. I always read it slowly deriving pleasure in every written word,phrase and sentence. Everyone must read it for the sheer joy of written word !
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sadya
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Post by sadya » 21 Apr 2015, 03:13

It has been some years since I last read it, but I like this book better than some of the more famous works of Dickens. I didn't like all parts of it though, some passages were too sweet, I'm not sure if that is the correct way to describe it, almost a bit too sentimal here and there perhaps. Other than that, I remember enjoying the story very much.

Sometimes my eyes pass the title on my book shelf and I remind myself, that I'd like to reread it one day and see what I think of it now.

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Big_B99
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Post by Big_B99 » 23 Apr 2015, 14:31

A Tale of Two Cities was my first Dickens, and I LOVE it! The first half was dragging on quite a bit, but as I continued reading it, I became more and more enthralled, and I sped through the last half. The ending was so powerful! Easily one of the greatest, if not THE greatest, ending paragraphs in classic literature.
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WardahEbrahim
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Post by WardahEbrahim » 25 Jun 2019, 04:19

Dickens writing is something get used to, but the storyline is great, and he very strategically made revelations that just kept me interested all the time.

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LinaMueller
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Post by LinaMueller » 25 Jun 2019, 17:52

The prose is pure poetry. Dickens' talent for social commentary is impressive as always.
Heart! We will forget him!
You an I, tonight!
You may forget the warmth he gave,
I will forget the light.

When you have done, pray tell me
That I my thoughts may dim;
Haste! lest while you're lagging.
I may remember him!

Emily Dickinson

Magnify3
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Post by Magnify3 » 30 Jun 2019, 11:15

I read an abridged version. At least it was something that was already on the shelf at home. I did enjoy the story. I found the ending heart breaking. I did read a few other books by Dickens but need to remember the titles of some of them. I can't forget Oliver Twist though.

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Oscar Ray
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Post by Oscar Ray » 06 Aug 2019, 18:44

I haven't read this book in over ten years, and I can still imagine the wine spilling through cobblestone streets in pre-revolution France. Nobody puts an image in my head like Dickens!

lettiebeth
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Post by lettiebeth » 07 Aug 2019, 01:29

A Tale of Two Cities was my first Dickens love. One of my first book loves, actually. I was given the Great Illustrated Classics version for my eighth birthday and I was hooked. A few years later I read the real version, and it is still my most re-read Dickens to this day.
There is something sublime in Dickens' ability to capture the whole spectrum of human emotion in the written word.
Ever since I was a kid, I have been captivated by this book, and Sidney Carton's sacrificial choice leaves one with a bittersweet feeling.
This is a beautiful, poignant, brilliant book.

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WardahEbrahim
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Post by WardahEbrahim » 19 Aug 2019, 05:31

shockernot_mc wrote:
16 Jan 2014, 21:15
My first impression of this book was how lllloooooonnnnnnggggg the opening sentence was. But by the end I was struck at how the first and last sentence (arguably two of the most famous literary lines ever) but served to remind the reader of his/her mortality.
A long sentence but a timeless sentence. It actually applies to so many places and so many eras including our own

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