Contemporary Fiction Books

Please use this sub-forum to discuss any fiction books or series that do not fit into one of the other categories. If the fiction book fits into one the other categories, please use that category instead.
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adayinabook
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Contemporary Romance Secrets by Robin Jones Gunn

Post by adayinabook » 25 Feb 2013, 17:48

Secrets by Robin Jones Gunn
Jessica “Fenton,” whose real name is Jessica Morgan is trying to hide her identity and begin a new life for herself. She crashes into Glenbrooke, Oregon rolling her car and being rescued by Prince Charming aka Kyle Buchanan. The teacher that was supposed to welcome her is also in the hospital in worse condition than her after a stroke. Her rescuer helps her find her way to her new home and helps her settle in. Jessica says she wants to be independent but in the process she pushes away everyone she meets.

Secrets is a very powerful book for me. It spoke to me probably more than any other book I’ve ever read. All in all the book deserves 5 stars. As I read I was frustrated with Jessica for letting her secret have so much power over her when she wanted to be free and independent. Even after Prince Charming spills his secret, she is still reluctant to give into hers until the new principal forces her into taking a “sick day.” It makes you scream JUST TELL EVERYONE ALREADY! HOW BAD CAN IT BE?? However, after reaching the end I was pretty satisfied with the story as a whole.

SaraKat_Johnson
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Post by SaraKat_Johnson » 31 Mar 2013, 14:30

What counts as contemporary fiction?

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MandiKenendy
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Post by MandiKenendy » 05 May 2013, 17:48

I would like to recommend Animal Factory by Edward Bunker. I've just re-read it for about the fifth time and I loved it as always. It's a platonic love story between two prisoners and the author, Bunker, uses his real life experiences as an ex-convict to make it realistic. It's a surprising mix of brutal and touching and one of my favourite books.

Also was reminded of a book I read recently by a post on here yesterday. I read The Faith by Amanda Tilbrook and I found it really interesting because it showed polygamy in a completely different light. I was interested in it because I loved the series Big Love so much and the blurb kind of reminded me of that and I liked how this idea of polygamy had multiple husbands and wives.

My final recommendation is Blind Faith by Ben Elton. This book is a very interesting look at what might happen in the future if social communication continues to grow and people continue to put more and more of their personal details on line. It was very interesting and made you really think about what might happen in the future.
You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body. - C.S. Lewis

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adina_jalali
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Post by adina_jalali » 08 May 2013, 15:43

I just recently finished a realistic fiction book by John Green called "The Fault In Our Stars." The story starts with a character named Hazel who has lung cancer. Her parents send her to support group, which is kind of like a cancer-anonymous. You talk about your treatment, how to deal with the emotional stress, etc. She meets a boy named Augustus at support group, he has some kind of cancer that spreads through his whole body, he even had to get one of his legs amputated. The story revolves around their love story and their share of interest for a certain book, and the longing to meet the author. By the end of the book, Augustus' cancer takes a turn for the worst, and he ends up passing away. The whole storyline was beautifully written, and I was engrossed throughout the whole read. I highly recommend it, although if you can't handle sad endings, it might not be a good choice for you.

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kdeering75
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Post by kdeering75 » 27 May 2013, 16:44

MandiKenendy wrote:I would like to recommend Animal Factory by Edward Bunker. I've just re-read it for about the fifth time and I loved it as always. It's a platonic love story between two prisoners and the author, Bunker, uses his real life experiences as an ex-convict to make it realistic. It's a surprising mix of brutal and touching and one of my favourite books.

Also was reminded of a book I read recently by a post on here yesterday. I read The Faith by Amanda Tilbrook and I found it really interesting because it showed polygamy in a completely different light. I was interested in it because I loved the series Big Love so much and the blurb kind of reminded me of that and I liked how this idea of polygamy had multiple husbands and wives.

My final recommendation is Blind Faith by Ben Elton. This book is a very interesting look at what might happen in the future if social communication continues to grow and people continue to put more and more of their personal details on line. It was very interesting and made you really think about what might happen in the future.
I'll have to try the Faith. I've read many biographies written by those who left polygamy and I'd love to see what this one is like.

LolaC
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Post by LolaC » 30 May 2013, 18:19

False Impressions by Jeffrey Archer is a good contemporary novel but his historical fiction seems to be better.
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MontyV
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Post by MontyV » 09 Jun 2013, 06:24

A great fictional piece on the woes and speculations of what could transcend the boundaries of human cloning and genetic engineering is "The Angel Maker" by Stefan Brijs. The novel was originally written in the Dutch, and beautifully translated. The book touches on topics from family values to morality, and the contemplation of man's desire to 'play God.' I must say that the first (of three) acts in the book moves somewhat slow, post the initial mysterious first chapters. However, once things get rolling, the real thrills begin as the backstory unfolds.

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suzy1124
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Post by suzy1124 » 14 Jun 2013, 06:33

John Irving, Pat Conroy, Philip Roth, Saul Bellow, Truman Capote, John Fowles, Joseph Heller, E.L. Doctorow, just to name a few...
" We don't see things as they are but as we are "

Carpe Diem!

Suzy...

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mansu
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Post by mansu » 29 Jun 2013, 04:27

try "Fame" by Tilly Bagshawe.. it's really good :)
Laugh while you still got teeth, you can smile later!

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MandiKenendy
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Post by MandiKenendy » 05 Jul 2013, 08:40

MontyV wrote:A great fictional piece on the woes and speculations of what could transcend the boundaries of human cloning and genetic engineering is "The Angel Maker" by Stefan Brijs. The novel was originally written in the Dutch, and beautifully translated. The book touches on topics from family values to morality, and the contemplation of man's desire to 'play God.' I must say that the first (of three) acts in the book moves somewhat slow, post the initial mysterious first chapters. However, once things get rolling, the real thrills begin as the backstory unfolds.
Have you read "Never Let Me Go" by Kazuo Ishiguro? It's a brilliant book and covers the issues surrounding cloning for medical reasons. It was very sad but very interesting.
You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body. - C.S. Lewis

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reluctantreader
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Post by reluctantreader » 05 Jul 2013, 13:01

I saw the film of Never Let me Go and thought it was the most depressing thing ever - did not make me want to read the book!

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MandiKenendy
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Post by MandiKenendy » 05 Jul 2013, 16:44

reluctantreader wrote:I saw the film of Never Let me Go and thought it was the most depressing thing ever - did not make me want to read the book!
I agree it was depressing but I think it needed to be to get the author's point across. It was supposed to make people consider the issue of cloning and what it might lead to.
You don't have a soul. You are a soul. You have a body. - C.S. Lewis

Skaka2u
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Post by Skaka2u » 11 Jul 2013, 20:32

Mary Metcalfe really touched my soul with her novel Winds of Change. This touching dramatic romance gives the reader a look into the full life from a child to senior citizen. I know next to nothing about gardening, but this novel had me very interested in starting a small gardening. Her character development of the four main characters set a well balanced tone for the storyline.

Jennifer's ability to learn to love again after so much lost at a late age, directly tied into Lana ability to accept love in her mid-twenties. Father and son, Mark and Ben's story played right along with the Lana and Jennifer's story. It was amazing seeing the lessons of forgiveness and lessons of trust being built between the characters. Although I do characterize this novel as sort of fictional romance it was so much more. Jennifer's relationship with her aging father, gave an overall message for everyone to cherish their parents while they are still here and in sound mind.

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priestm1
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Post by priestm1 » 06 Aug 2013, 10:45

I just finished The Hunger Games series and I was BLOWN AWAY. I know I'm a little late in the game but I figured I should read them before the second movie came out. If you haven't read this series yet, I strongly suggest it. Suzanne Collins has a way with character development that attaches you to the characters from the first page. You genuinely feel Katniss' struggle with the games, her love for both Peeta and Gale, and all of the heartbreak she faces throughout the series. You can feel every character's emotions as if they were your own. I would LOVE if this series were able to continue.

-- 06 Aug 2013, 11:48 --
adina_jalali wrote:I just recently finished a realistic fiction book by John Green called "The Fault In Our Stars." The story starts with a character named Hazel who has lung cancer. Her parents send her to support group, which is kind of like a cancer-anonymous. You talk about your treatment, how to deal with the emotional stress, etc. She meets a boy named Augustus at support group, he has some kind of cancer that spreads through his whole body, he even had to get one of his legs amputated. The story revolves around their love story and their share of interest for a certain book, and the longing to meet the author. By the end of the book, Augustus' cancer takes a turn for the worst, and he ends up passing away. The whole storyline was beautifully written, and I was engrossed throughout the whole read. I highly recommend it, although if you can't handle sad endings, it might not be a good choice for you.
I'm in love with this book! A girl I work with let me borrow her copy and I finished it in one sitting! I'm working on getting all of John Green's books now to see if the others are as good. I cried nearly the entire second half of the book.

-- 06 Aug 2013, 11:51 --

Does anyone know of an author similar to Suzanne Collins? She wrote The Hunger Games series. I really love books that take place in a sort of dystopian society like that and would love to read books that are similar.

srivolco
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Post by srivolco » 31 Aug 2013, 07:18

I have just finished reading Ruin By Rachael Van Dyken. The book deals with the typical college romance but in its most innocent form that we rarely get to experience these days. The underlying idea of love trumping all odds was a definite upside to an otherwise ordinary story. Anyone who wants a walk down the traditional romantic times do read the book.
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