The author's inspiration.

Use this forum to discuss the May 2019 Book of the month, "Misreading Judas" by Robert Wahler
Forum rules
NOTICE: The author of this book was invited to participate in the discussion in this forum about his book. You should expect that the author is reading and may reply to posts made in this forum.

While the forums typically have a rule against authors/publishers talking about their own book on the forums at all as a way to prevent spam, an author discussing their own book in the dedicated discussion forum about that book is an exception and is allowed, including posting would-be self-promotional links to his book or related material insofar as is relevant to the discussion.

However, other forum rules and standards, such as those requiring upmost civility and politeness, are of course still in effect.
Post Reply
User avatar
Ferdinand_otieno
Posts: 1921
Joined: 03 Jun 2017, 12:54
2019 Reading Goal: 300
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 77
2018 Reading Goal: 250
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 140
2017 Reading Goal: 200
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 94
Favorite Author: Victor Rose
Currently Reading: Amethyst of Destiny
Bookshelf Size: 832
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-ferdinand-otieno.html
Latest Review: Peoushi: An American Legend by Michael F. McWilliams
fav_author_id: 78026

Re: The author's inspiration.

Post by Ferdinand_otieno » 04 May 2019, 10:22

Sahansdal wrote:
04 May 2019, 09:17
Ellylion wrote:
03 May 2019, 14:43
The author is not the first one to start a controversial discussion addressing Gnostic beliefs. I guess Dan Brown made them a popular trend still years ago :)
I am no to be compared to Dan Brown. I hate that! He writes fiction. I'm interested in explaining in the best way possible what is really happening with the ancient texts and what the Church did.
:tiphat:

Sahansdal
Posts: 569
Joined: 15 Jul 2018, 22:12
Bookshelf Size: 0

Post by Sahansdal » 04 May 2019, 11:07

WaryReader wrote:
03 May 2019, 10:42
I think he just wants to get his unorthodox opinion out there. If he knows anything about the Christian faith, he should know that his book conveys a pretty controversial message, but maybe he wants to express something that he found profound and worthwhile in a professional way. :techie-reference:
Yes, the latter.

User avatar
reneelu1998
Posts: 176
Joined: 30 Mar 2019, 16:27
2019 Reading Goal: 50
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 124
Favorite Book: The Outsiders
Currently Reading: The Great Dune Trilogy
Bookshelf Size: 91
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-reneelu1998.html
Latest Review: The Cult Next Door by Elizabeth R. Burchard, Judith L. Carlone
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by reneelu1998 » 04 May 2019, 16:29

Michgal 32 wrote:
03 May 2019, 03:42
What do you think could be the author's inspiration in writing this book?
I think a lot of his inspiration would be from the research that he did. When he was able to find some interesting ideas from the non-canonical scriptures, he was able to develop an interesting enough idea to write a whole book out of. I respect the author for being able to write such a well-written book based off of these ideas.

User avatar
reneelu1998
Posts: 176
Joined: 30 Mar 2019, 16:27
2019 Reading Goal: 50
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 124
Favorite Book: The Outsiders
Currently Reading: The Great Dune Trilogy
Bookshelf Size: 91
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-reneelu1998.html
Latest Review: The Cult Next Door by Elizabeth R. Burchard, Judith L. Carlone
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by reneelu1998 » 04 May 2019, 16:29

Sahansdal wrote:
04 May 2019, 11:07
WaryReader wrote:
03 May 2019, 10:42
I think he just wants to get his unorthodox opinion out there. If he knows anything about the Christian faith, he should know that his book conveys a pretty controversial message, but maybe he wants to express something that he found profound and worthwhile in a professional way. :techie-reference:
Yes, the latter.
Yes, I agree with that comment. The idea is pretty controversial.

User avatar
srividyag1
Posts: 348
Joined: 30 Jan 2019, 21:26
2019 Reading Goal: 50
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 98
Currently Reading: The laws of human nature
Bookshelf Size: 109
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-srividyag1.html
Latest Review: The Hungry Heart by Brenda Gayle
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by srividyag1 » 04 May 2019, 21:30

I think the author is interested in presenting his findings, like a research. The effort and time he has put into this work is evident. And the book reads like a scientific paper with references. Considering this, I think the author's inspiration would probably have been the deep rooted hatred of a single man and the curiosity whether he actually was hateful - whether Judas actually deserves the way he is treated. That being said, the author also connects Christianity to gnostic thoughts, so perhaps he was also inspired by their spiritual teaching.
- Srividya Giri
*****************************
Smile more, it's infectious.
*****************************

User avatar
Bluebird03
Posts: 1287
Joined: 29 Dec 2018, 20:13
2019 Reading Goal: 65
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 181
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 127
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bluebird03.html
Latest Review: The Good Stuff by Liz Loughlin

Post by Bluebird03 » 05 May 2019, 10:50

I am guessing that his background as a Gnostic and his belief in the Gospel of Judas is what interested him in the beginning. Particularly with the Gnostic goal of self-sacrifice in mind, he questioned the validity of the version in the New Testament and centered his research around that point.

User avatar
A G Darr
Posts: 94
Joined: 02 Oct 2018, 17:33
Currently Reading: Roadmap to the end of days
Bookshelf Size: 28
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-a-g-darr.html
Latest Review: Debt Cleanse by Jorge P. Newbery

Post by A G Darr » 05 May 2019, 16:30

The author is Gnostic and have views that differ from the more broadly accepted beliefs in Christianity. The Gnostic view seems to aim at the Bible not being a history, but a metaphorical guide to salvation and redemption. The idea that Judas was misframed as a betrayer would be very attractive to a Gnostic trying to change the perception of the Bible as a straight history. Judas is a well known character of the Bible. Even individuals without a religion have probably heard of Judas at some point, even if it is just through pop culture references. By choosing such a large figure, and such a polarizing subject, the author would have a greater chance of sowing seeds of interest and curiosity to a broader audience. If he would have chosen a lesser known story, or it he would have sampled several instances of Bible stories being misread, I feel the book would have lost its gravitas.

User avatar
Dragonsend
Posts: 473
Joined: 05 Mar 2019, 19:30
2019 Reading Goal: 12
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 450
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 88
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-dragonsend.html
Latest Review: Bluewater Walkabout by Tina Dreffin

Post by Dragonsend » 06 May 2019, 12:33

I read a little on gnostic beliefs and they do have a way of reinterpreting things, sometimes in a very unhealthy light. Do I believe the author uses this as a foundation? So far yes, for I have not finished reading but yes from what I have learned I believe he is definitely influenced by these beliefs.
The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance. 2 Peter 3:9 :angelic-grayflying:

Sahansdal
Posts: 569
Joined: 15 Jul 2018, 22:12
Bookshelf Size: 0

Post by Sahansdal » 06 May 2019, 23:23

srividyag1 wrote:
04 May 2019, 21:30
I think the author is interested in presenting his findings, like a research. The effort and time he has put into this work is evident. And the book reads like a scientific paper with references. Considering this, I think the author's inspiration would probably have been the deep rooted hatred of a single man and the curiosity whether he actually was hateful - whether Judas actually deserves the way he is treated. That being said, the author also connects Christianity to gnostic thoughts, so perhaps he was also inspired by their spiritual teaching.
I am a Satsangi with the Radha Soami Satsang Beas, and have been since 1975. That's a long time. My understanding of mysticism has only grown since then. I was a Christian before that, and a 24/7 one, living with brothers in a brothers house. I don't do anything halfway! The teachings of RSSB are IDENTICAL to Gnostic teachings, right down to the words they use, if you will believe it. Anami Desh of the Sant Mat Masters, the Region with no name, is "the region never called by any name" in the Gospel of Judas. How is that for a match! Yes the cosmology is the same. Even Paul "knew a man" (likely James, not himself, as so many may think) who went to the third heaven. Sant Mat and Gnostic teaching hold that there are seven heavens. The ticket to ride is the Word (Bible), or Unspoken Melody (Sant Mat), the Apophasis Logos of the gnostic Gospels of Thomas and Judas. Btw, this is the Name of the Lord in the Tanak (Old Testament). It is all the same teaching!!!

Sahansdal
Posts: 569
Joined: 15 Jul 2018, 22:12
Bookshelf Size: 0

Post by Sahansdal » 06 May 2019, 23:37

A G Darr wrote:
05 May 2019, 16:30
The author is Gnostic and have views that differ from the more broadly accepted beliefs in Christianity. The Gnostic view seems to aim at the Bible not being a history, but a metaphorical guide to salvation and redemption. The idea that Judas was misframed as a betrayer would be very attractive to a Gnostic trying to change the perception of the Bible as a straight history. Judas is a well known character of the Bible. Even individuals without a religion have probably heard of Judas at some point, even if it is just through pop culture references. By choosing such a large figure, and such a polarizing subject, the author would have a greater chance of sowing seeds of interest and curiosity to a broader audience. If he would have chosen a lesser known story, or it he would have sampled several instances of Bible stories being misread, I feel the book would have lost its gravitas.
The genesis of Judas is an interesting question -- one I have not fully nailed down. He is definitely James, but how this all came about is not clear. There was NO Judas -- he is purely a cover for a real person, James the Just. Dr. Robert Eisenman was the first to point this out, in Acts 1. (He also shows why 'Stephen' in Acts 7 is also a cover for James.) I took it from there and looked in the Gospels for more. I found James everywhere. That is what my two books (on Amazon) are about. It is curious why Eisenman wasn't more interested in Judas as James in "The Betrayal." This is by far the most interesting part of the saga. I can't get enough. The details are mind-blowing. No question at all - 'Judas' was James, and it was all for a reason: to hide his coming.

User avatar
lucia_kizas
Posts: 166
Joined: 20 Mar 2018, 07:44
2019 Reading Goal: 30
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 36
2018 Reading Goal: 20
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 160
Favorite Author: Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 47
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-lucia-kizas.html
Latest Review: Geraldine by Edmund M Aristone
fav_author_id: 2366

Post by lucia_kizas » 07 May 2019, 09:11

Honestly, the idea of Judas not being the "bad guy" is not entirely new, as many of you stated here as well. But I haven't yet seen any books dedicated to Judas personally. It is great that somebody is willing to change the perspective of commonly accepted ideas.

User avatar
Sushan
Posts: 1124
Joined: 04 May 2018, 19:13
2019 Reading Goal: 10
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 100
2018 Reading Goal: 10
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 230
2017 Reading Goal: 0
Currently Reading: Gringo
Bookshelf Size: 248
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sushan.html
Latest Review: Happy Healing by Dominique Bourlet

Post by Sushan » 08 May 2019, 10:02

I don't think he has got any harmful intentions in writing this book. Simply he has opened a new window to expand the ways of human thinking, and it is up to readers to take it in any direction that they want
"He has a right to criticize, who has a heart to help"

Abraham Lincoln



:techie-studyingbrown: $u$han €kanayak€ :techie-studyingbrown:

Lhisa
Posts: 45
Joined: 18 Sep 2018, 11:00
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 14
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-lhisa.html
Latest Review: We are Voulhire: A New Arrival under Great Skies by Matthew Tysz

Post by Lhisa » 08 May 2019, 14:56

I think that the author's inspiration may be liked to Gnosticism, I think it may just be the author's way of bringing across the message that things are not always as they seem and that one should look under the surface of what information is presented to us. In the case of Judas, I think of him as a lesson to be learnt from, no matter how you spin it, betrayal is a horrible thing and Judas betrayed the one he claimed to love. He betrayed his faith and then instead of facing that, he chose to take his own life. Everyone is free to express their own views on the matter, I just choose to agree to disagree.

User avatar
tanner87cbs
Posts: 42
Joined: 22 Feb 2019, 18:35
2019 Reading Goal: 12
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 200
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 60
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-tanner87cbs.html
Latest Review: No Dark Clouds by R W Nelson

Post by tanner87cbs » 08 May 2019, 16:11

It could almost be observed that the inspiration was an extension of the Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown. Although, I think the author really just wanted to share his findings and raise awareness of what he perceives to be the truth. It is great to have an open discussion on topics like this. However, I feel if the delivery would of been more neutral and not as abrasive, it would have sparked better discussion.

User avatar
Dragonsend
Posts: 473
Joined: 05 Mar 2019, 19:30
2019 Reading Goal: 12
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 450
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 88
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-dragonsend.html
Latest Review: Bluewater Walkabout by Tina Dreffin

Post by Dragonsend » 08 May 2019, 16:51

Sahansdal wrote:
06 May 2019, 23:37
A G Darr wrote:
05 May 2019, 16:30
The author is Gnostic and have views that differ from the more broadly accepted beliefs in Christianity. The Gnostic view seems to aim at the Bible not being a history, but a metaphorical guide to salvation and redemption. The idea that Judas was misframed as a betrayer would be very attractive to a Gnostic trying to change the perception of the Bible as a straight history. Judas is a well known character of the Bible. Even individuals without a religion have probably heard of Judas at some point, even if it is just through pop culture references. By choosing such a large figure, and such a polarizing subject, the author would have a greater chance of sowing seeds of interest and curiosity to a broader audience. If he would have chosen a lesser known story, or it he would have sampled several instances of Bible stories being misread, I feel the book would have lost its gravitas.
The genesis of Judas is an interesting question -- one I have not fully nailed down. He is definitely James, but how this all came about is not clear. There was NO Judas -- he is purely a cover for a real person, James the Just. Dr. Robert Eisenman was the first to point this out, in Acts 1. (He also shows why 'Stephen' in Acts 7 is also a cover for James.) I took it from there and looked in the Gospels for more. I found James everywhere. That is what my two books (on Amazon) are about. It is curious why Eisenman wasn't more interested in Judas as James in "The Betrayal." This is by far the most interesting part of the saga. I can't get enough. The details are mind-blowing. No question at all - 'Judas' was James, and it was all for a reason: to hide his coming.
I have a hard time accepting James as Judas, the numbers do not add up as far as apostle wise and though there are sameness in the way they die and other sameness, they are distinct and different actual writings by each. This isn't even disputed in your writings.
The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance. 2 Peter 3:9 :angelic-grayflying:

Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "Misreading Judas" by Robert Wahler”