Use of Questions

Use this forum to discuss the July 2018 Book of the Month "Toni the Superhero" by R.D. Base
Post Reply
User avatar
meadhbh
Posts: 186
Joined: 16 Apr 2018, 18:30
2018 Reading Goal: 30
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 40
Currently Reading: Serendipity Mystery: Diary of a Snoopy Cat
Bookshelf Size: 29
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-meadhbh.html
Latest Review: The Last Rite by Chad Morgan

Re: Use of Questions

Post by meadhbh » 07 Aug 2018, 18:37

I think the point of this book is to teach reading, rather than any specific message or talking point

User avatar
Jennifer Fernandez
Posts: 226
Joined: 09 Jun 2018, 21:30
2018 Reading Goal: 10
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 210
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 69
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-jennifer-fernandez.html
Latest Review: The Enemy In Me by Jacob Newell Campbell

Post by Jennifer Fernandez » 07 Aug 2018, 20:07

Kibetious wrote:
11 Jul 2018, 08:31
Reading this book, one can realize that there are quite a number of lessons to be drawn from it. However, these lessons may prove hard to point out for the kids. Should there be a section where the reader is asked to point out lessons learned or perhaps, in the end, asked whether Toni is a superhero and give reasons for the answer?
Would like to hear get comments on this.
Not really. If a parent is with the child he or she could do it by themselves. And if the child is reading alone the wouldn't pay much attention to it.
The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. - H.P. Lovecraft :techie-studyinggray:

User avatar
Larry_Moen
Posts: 1
Joined: 08 Aug 2018, 04:54
Bookshelf Size: 0

Post by Larry_Moen » 08 Aug 2018, 04:58

I think it could use more direction in the points your trying to make

User avatar
BookishCoffeeBlog
Posts: 80
Joined: 29 May 2018, 16:42
2019 Reading Goal: 10
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 10
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 14
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 33
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bookishcoffeeblog.html
Latest Review: The Crystilleries of Echoland by Dew Pellucid

Post by BookishCoffeeBlog » 10 Aug 2018, 03:15

I think this would be awesome. Parents should interact with their kids in regards to reading because it helps with their comprehension of the story. I think adding questions to the end of the book would facilitate with this and make it easier for the child and the parent.

User avatar
Fozia-Bajwa
Posts: 670
Joined: 05 May 2018, 13:04
Currently Reading: Mining for Alaskan Adventures
Bookshelf Size: 257
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-fozia-bajwa.html
Latest Review: McDowell by William H. Coles

Post by Fozia-Bajwa » 10 Aug 2018, 05:04

Yeah it's right.
There should be a section at the point of special lines of story to make it meaningful.
If there is not a section included in the story at each specific point, the reader will continue to read without diverting his/her concentration.

David Horta Alonso
Posts: 247
Joined: 28 Jul 2018, 12:57
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 19
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-david-horta-alonso.html
Latest Review: Twisted Threads by Kaylin McFarren

Post by David Horta Alonso » 10 Aug 2018, 10:55

Questions aren't captured in the book but I'm opined that would be an excellent addition. It would boost children memory of that which has already been learnt. Children learn faster through questions and answers.

User avatar
Cotwani
Posts: 1759
Joined: 01 Nov 2017, 16:12
2019 Reading Goal: 50
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 20
2018 Reading Goal: 200
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 10
2017 Reading Goal: 200
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 4
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 188
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-cotwani.html
Latest Review: Claimed by Nicolai by Denna Holm

Post by Cotwani » 24 Aug 2018, 01:42

Having a simple question like 'do you like.... ' at the end of some activities could probably make the read more engaging but adding a section asking what the reader learnt may dampen the upbeat mood of the book!
There is more treasure in books than in all the pirates’ loot on Treasure Island!
-Walt Disney

User avatar
Cher432
Posts: 390
Joined: 25 Aug 2018, 08:54
2019 Reading Goal: 20
Currently Reading: The Banned Book about Love
Bookshelf Size: 132
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-cher432.html
Latest Review: Blue Notes and Sad Chords by Brian Hebert

Post by Cher432 » 25 Aug 2018, 13:41

I think that would be an unnecessary addition as the book is meant to be a fun way for parents to teach their kids to read. Lessons learnt should be left upto individual parents.

User avatar
Sicily Joy
Posts: 207
Joined: 25 May 2018, 23:57
2019 Reading Goal: 48
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 8
2018 Reading Goal: 60
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 15
Currently Reading: Becoming
Bookshelf Size: 897
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sicily-joy.html
Latest Review: Cat Detectives in the Korean Peninsula by R.F. Kristi

Post by Sicily Joy » 28 Aug 2018, 00:03

kfwilson6 wrote:
13 Jul 2018, 14:13
I think the lessons are meant to be subtle. Sort of a subliminal messaging type of thing, like when a character in a movie drinks a coke, you may not realize later what made you want a coke, but it was that image of it on the screen. It's not a right in your face sort of lesson. I like it without the questions. Questions can be added by the parent during shared reading time.
I agree. Since this is a book for young children learning to read I don't think they need big discussion questions. It is those subtle messages that are going to stick in their forming mind.

Onyinye Excel
Posts: 205
Joined: 30 Aug 2018, 06:54
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 26
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-onyinye-excel.html
Latest Review: We are Voulhire: Someone Else's End by Matthew Tysz

Post by Onyinye Excel » 30 Aug 2018, 11:24

Yes such a session would be helpful especially for children.

User avatar
Braunsucre
Posts: 49
Joined: 11 Jul 2018, 15:37
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 19
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-braunsucre.html
Latest Review: The Traveler's Best Seller by Rick Incorvia

Post by Braunsucre » 01 Sep 2018, 15:12

I think questions for discussions would be unnecessary for a book such as this. Most would simply read it for fun.

Mumanyi
Posts: 51
Joined: 02 Aug 2018, 10:38
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 24
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-mumanyi.html
Latest Review: Red Wave Imperative by Alan Schein

Post by Mumanyi » 01 Sep 2018, 17:23

Yes adding questions at the end would be a good idea but also, I would suggest that the author includes those questions as part of the story to engage the child and the parent or supervised for that matter.

User avatar
a9436
Posts: 246
Joined: 07 Jul 2018, 13:18
2019 Reading Goal: 12
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 16
Currently Reading: The Redbreast
Bookshelf Size: 76
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-a9436.html
Latest Review: First Family by Alice Langholt

Post by a9436 » 04 Sep 2018, 15:04

I work in education and I ultimately think a good parent or educator should know how to spot and utilise the teaching opportunities without a prompt, but for those who are just starting to read with children I like the idea of a list as an appendix. It would not hurt; those who do not like the idea could of course simply ignore it.

User avatar
Kgaelsdottir
Posts: 38
Joined: 26 Aug 2018, 01:53
Currently Reading: Good Omens
Bookshelf Size: 91
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-kgaelsdottir.html
Latest Review: Final Report by Jeff Shear

Post by Kgaelsdottir » 08 Sep 2018, 15:30

Kibetious wrote:
11 Jul 2018, 08:31
Reading this book, one can realize that there are quite a number of lessons to be drawn from it. However, these lessons may prove hard to point out for the kids. Should there be a section where the reader is asked to point out lessons learned or perhaps, in the end, asked whether Toni is a superhero and give reasons for the answer?
Would like to hear get comments on this.
I know some authors provide a kind of "study guide" if their point is to be instructive; that seems like it might help here. But then, too, sometimes those who aren't the writer can come up with better questions--as there aren't so many preconceived notions by the author?

User avatar
Bluecobia
Posts: 339
Joined: 08 Jul 2017, 12:19
2019 Reading Goal: 20
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 25
2018 Reading Goal: 26
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 61
2017 Reading Goal: 20
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 45
Currently Reading: Game of Thrones
Bookshelf Size: 55
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-bluecobia.html
Latest Review: The miner by F.Robert

Post by Bluecobia » 08 Sep 2018, 15:50

At this age of reader I think formal questions are not needed. If the child has questions or if the parents want to emphasize something, that is fine but this is not a school class . Formal questions would take away from enjoying the story.
Latest Review: The miner by F.Robert

Post Reply

Return to “Discuss "Toni the Superhero" by R.D. Base”