Contribution to Diversity

Use this forum to discuss the July 2018 Book of the Month "Toni the Superhero" by R.D. Base
Post Reply
User avatar
xBibliobibulix
Posts: 45
Joined: 20 Jul 2018, 18:22
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 5
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 1638
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-xbibliobibulix.html
Latest Review: Serendipity Mystery: Diary of a Snoopy Cat by R.F. Kristi

Re: Contribution to Diversity

Post by xBibliobibulix » 22 Jul 2018, 15:10

Books with diversity are incredibly important right now, especially children's books, and even more especially books written by diverse authors. The author is a black woman and she brings this experience to the book and champions diversity.

User avatar
CheyenneCollins
Posts: 1
Joined: 22 Jul 2018, 16:25
Bookshelf Size: 0

Post by CheyenneCollins » 22 Jul 2018, 16:31

It helps the race factor that a lot of people look into nowadays. It gives a touch of diversity & expands growth of heroic aspects.

User avatar
Samy Lax
Posts: 941
Joined: 30 Jan 2018, 01:40
2019 Reading Goal: 53
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 54
2018 Reading Goal: 38
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 118
Currently Reading: Dealing with the Devil
Bookshelf Size: 117
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-samy-lax.html
Latest Review: An Uncommon Journey: Leadership Lessons from a preschool teacher who became a university president by Shirley Raines

Post by Samy Lax » 22 Jul 2018, 22:50

You're right. This point is another one of the strengths of this book. As far as I could see, this book teaches a number of wonderful lessons that even we adults - who sometimes end up acting worse than kids - could benefit from.
β€œMy theory is - we don't really go that far into other people, even when we think we do. We hardly ever go in and bring them out. We just stand at the jaws of the cave, and strike a match, and quickly as if anybody's there.”
― Martin Amis, Money

User avatar
Sarah Tariq
Posts: 1809
Joined: 17 Mar 2017, 02:17
2019 Reading Goal: 25
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 32
2018 Reading Goal: 25
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 96
2017 Reading Goal: 15
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 46
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 143
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sarah-tariq.html
Latest Review: Winning the War on Cancer by Sylvie Beljanski
Reading Device: PDF

Post by Sarah Tariq » 23 Jul 2018, 13:17

CambaReviewer wrote: ↑
08 Jul 2018, 17:20
To be honest, this social inclusion message may be obvious to adults, but for children between the ages of 3 to 6, who I think are the target audience in this book, they will hardly notice. Usually at their age, unless someone has taken great pains to teach them discrimination based on race or gender, most children will just be children and will naturally interact freely and play with each other. It is a useful message though. I did not even think about it when I read the book.
obviously at this tender age, children pay no attention to such ethnic differences. However, it's an underlying message to eradicate biasness based on ethnicity.
Make your ideals high enough to inspire you and low enough to encourage you.

πŸ“•πŸ“–πŸ“°πŸ““πŸ“•

User avatar
Sarah Tariq
Posts: 1809
Joined: 17 Mar 2017, 02:17
2019 Reading Goal: 25
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 32
2018 Reading Goal: 25
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 96
2017 Reading Goal: 15
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 46
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 143
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sarah-tariq.html
Latest Review: Winning the War on Cancer by Sylvie Beljanski
Reading Device: PDF

Post by Sarah Tariq » 23 Jul 2018, 13:21

ereason wrote: ↑
08 Jul 2018, 05:22
I noticed that Toni had all sorts of friends, boys, girls, diverse cultures, and also that it wasn't just Mum=chores, friends=fun. I don't think very young children will be conscious of the message, but it will (subtly, as you say) show them that friends don't have to be identical. It turns it into a non-issue before they're old to realise that once upon a time it may have been an issue.
Children are just children, free from pride and prejudice. So I think this message is more for adults who pour ethnic differences in the minds of young ones.
Make your ideals high enough to inspire you and low enough to encourage you.

πŸ“•πŸ“–πŸ“°πŸ““πŸ“•

User avatar
Sarah Tariq
Posts: 1809
Joined: 17 Mar 2017, 02:17
2019 Reading Goal: 25
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 32
2018 Reading Goal: 25
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 96
2017 Reading Goal: 15
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 46
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 143
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sarah-tariq.html
Latest Review: Winning the War on Cancer by Sylvie Beljanski
Reading Device: PDF

Post by Sarah Tariq » 23 Jul 2018, 13:25

Samy Lax wrote: ↑
22 Jul 2018, 22:50
You're right. This point is another one of the strengths of this book. As far as I could see, this book teaches a number of wonderful lessons that even we adults - who sometimes end up acting worse than kids - could benefit from.
This book holds good lessons for adults too. Especially when we talk about ethnic differences. This teaches us good lesson to built a strong bind between the children of different ethnicity and races.
Make your ideals high enough to inspire you and low enough to encourage you.

πŸ“•πŸ“–πŸ“°πŸ““πŸ“•

User avatar
Sarah Tariq
Posts: 1809
Joined: 17 Mar 2017, 02:17
2019 Reading Goal: 25
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 32
2018 Reading Goal: 25
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 96
2017 Reading Goal: 15
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 46
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 143
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sarah-tariq.html
Latest Review: Winning the War on Cancer by Sylvie Beljanski
Reading Device: PDF

Post by Sarah Tariq » 23 Jul 2018, 13:29

CheyenneCollins wrote: ↑
22 Jul 2018, 16:31
It helps the race factor that a lot of people look into nowadays. It gives a touch of diversity & expands growth of heroic aspects.
Of course, when people belonging to different cultures are united together , it adds to cultural diversity. People learn from different cultures so do the children.
Make your ideals high enough to inspire you and low enough to encourage you.

πŸ“•πŸ“–πŸ“°πŸ““πŸ“•

User avatar
Izesicle
Posts: 748
Joined: 25 Jun 2017, 00:16
2018 Reading Goal: 48
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 20
2017 Reading Goal: 20
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 45
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 140
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-izesicle.html
Latest Review: With Malice Aforethought by Thonie Hevron
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by Izesicle » 23 Jul 2018, 18:40

CambaReviewer wrote: ↑
08 Jul 2018, 17:20
To be honest, this social inclusion message may be obvious to adults, but for children between the ages of 3 to 6, who I think are the target audience in this book, they will hardly notice. Usually at their age, unless someone has taken great pains to teach them discrimination based on race or gender, most children will just be children and will naturally interact freely and play with each other. It is a useful message though. I did not even think about it when I read the book.
I agree with this. There might be benefit for the adults to highlight the lesson on inclusion to the child reader; however, children typically start out as non-discriminatory.

User avatar
Dael Reader
Posts: 684
Joined: 05 May 2018, 08:39
Currently Reading: The Story of Arthur Truluv
Bookshelf Size: 53
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-dael-reader.html
Latest Review: Extraordinary Stories From Everyday People (and me) by Les Clark
Reading Device: 1400697484

Post by Dael Reader » 24 Jul 2018, 20:21

I noticed the diversity in the illustrations right away and I think the author and illustrator should be commended for being so intentional about it. It is never to early to help children see that friends--and superheroes--come in many different shapes, sizes, genders, and races.

User avatar
Vscholz
Posts: 455
Joined: 09 Jul 2018, 00:59
2019 Reading Goal: 70
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 14
2018 Reading Goal: 65
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 55
Currently Reading: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone
Bookshelf Size: 816
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-vscholz.html
Latest Review: Primrose’s Curse by Kiara Shankar, Vinay Shankar
Reading Device: B00JG8GOWU

Post by Vscholz » 24 Jul 2018, 23:41

kfwilson6 wrote: ↑
09 Jul 2018, 12:01
CambaReviewer wrote: ↑
08 Jul 2018, 17:20
To be honest, this social inclusion message may be obvious to adults, but for children between the ages of 3 to 6, who I think are the target audience in this book, they will hardly notice. Usually at their age, unless someone has taken great pains to teach them discrimination based on race or gender, most children will just be children and will naturally interact freely and play with each other. It is a useful message though. I did not even think about it when I read the book.
I absolutely agree with you. I didn't even think about Toni or the other children's ethnicities/nationalities/races until these forum discussions began. I just saw a group of kids and the two women I assumed to be mom and sister. I think children will see this in the same light.
It is so heartwarming to think about children not seeing issues with race and viewing Toni's friends as friends rather than labeled. Because of my educational background, I almost automatically theorize about what themes are present in a text. That being said, I study children's/adolescent/YA literature not with the view of how to teach it to the target audience but instead I look at it the same way I would Shelley or the Brontes. The subtle messages play an important role in analysis and interpretation, and I love how they are used in books targeted to younger readers.
As for you & your heart & the things you said & didn't say, she will remember them all when men are fairy tales in books written by rabbits. (Schmendrick the Magician)

User avatar
Sarah Tariq
Posts: 1809
Joined: 17 Mar 2017, 02:17
2019 Reading Goal: 25
2019 Reading Goal Completion: 32
2018 Reading Goal: 25
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 96
2017 Reading Goal: 15
2017 Reading Goal Completion: 46
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 143
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-sarah-tariq.html
Latest Review: Winning the War on Cancer by Sylvie Beljanski
Reading Device: PDF

Post by Sarah Tariq » 25 Jul 2018, 10:11

julessawyer wrote: ↑
09 Jul 2018, 11:20
I think kids rarely see color but racism like all prejudices is learned. It will be good to teach kids at a young age about not fearing the "others" that don't look like him/herself.
Children have no prejudices. Even maybe they will not notice this racial discrimination. It's a responsibility of parents to teach children racial tolerance. And through this book parents can perform this task easily.
Make your ideals high enough to inspire you and low enough to encourage you.

πŸ“•πŸ“–πŸ“°πŸ““πŸ“•

User avatar
Nena_Morena
Posts: 120
Joined: 19 Feb 2018, 20:39
2018 Reading Goal: 100
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 21
Favorite Book: The Notebook
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 37
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-nena-morena.html
Latest Review: Getting Used to Success by H.J. Shalev

Post by Nena_Morena » 25 Jul 2018, 21:03

This is a very good point. I'm really happy that this book showed how kids from different ethnicities can be friends. It's something that I teach my kids and I think a lot of adults should take this as an example.

User avatar
DustinPBrown
Posts: 178
Joined: 10 Oct 2017, 15:58
Currently Reading: My Family and Other Animals
Bookshelf Size: 310
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-dustinpbrown.html
Latest Review: It's Never Water Under the Bridge by Rianne Moss

Post by DustinPBrown » 26 Jul 2018, 06:42

Sarah Tariq wrote: ↑
25 Jul 2018, 10:11
julessawyer wrote: ↑
09 Jul 2018, 11:20
I think kids rarely see color but racism like all prejudices is learned. It will be good to teach kids at a young age about not fearing the "others" that don't look like him/herself.
Children have no prejudices. Even maybe they will not notice this racial discrimination. It's a responsibility of parents to teach children racial tolerance. And through this book parents can perform this task easily.
Books are a fantastic way of teaching kids to develop empathy. It's the closest thing we have to living another person's life and experiencing what they've gone through. I'm very glad this book does such a good job of showing diversity.

User avatar
Raya raymond
Posts: 273
Joined: 09 Jul 2017, 05:48
Currently Reading: One for the Road
Bookshelf Size: 65
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-raya-raymond.html
Latest Review: Triumph Over Tears by Nava Chernoff

Post by Raya raymond » 26 Jul 2018, 06:51

I think this book Is great to teach children about diversity and the importance of accepting each other with our differences. The portrayal of Tony as an African American kid was actually one of my favorite things about this book

User avatar
Allyseria
Posts: 390
Joined: 18 Jul 2018, 16:33
2018 Reading Goal: 50
2018 Reading Goal Completion: 58
Currently Reading:
Bookshelf Size: 68
Reviewer Page: onlinebookclub.org/reviews/by-allyseria.html
Latest Review: Of Zots and Xoodles by Zarqnon the Embarrassed

Post by Allyseria » 26 Jul 2018, 19:17

ereason wrote: ↑
08 Jul 2018, 05:22
I noticed that Toni had all sorts of friends, boys, girls, diverse cultures, and also that it wasn't just Mum=chores, friends=fun. I don't think very young children will be conscious of the message, but it will (subtly, as you say) show them that friends don't have to be identical. It turns it into a non-issue before they're old to realise that once upon a time it may have been an issue.
This is exactly what I thought! I think the book is great in this aspect and I wish that more children books would do the same. I have great hopes for the next book in the series :D

Post Reply

Return to β€œDiscuss "Toni the Superhero" by R.D. Base”