Toni's dislikes

Use this forum to discuss the July 2018 Book of the Month "Toni the Superhero" by R.D. Base
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Sarah Tariq
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Re: Toni's dislikes

Post by Sarah Tariq » 30 Jul 2018, 10:09

Oscar Osman wrote:
30 Jul 2018, 01:12
Dislikes will slow the flow of a story.
Absolutely not. Rather it will bring diversity and balance in Toni personality. However it should be kept as simple as possible for children.
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Post by Purity chelagat » 30 Jul 2018, 15:01

I agree that dislikes should be included in a book writing because dislikes are normal anyway

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Post by Dolor » 30 Jul 2018, 21:51

It would have been better if the author had included Toni's dislikes.

For example, Toni dislikes scattered toys. After playing, he usually put them back and arrange them in their proper places.

Toni dislikes eating vegetables, but because they are good for his health, he eats all the vegetables his mom put on his plate. That makes him a superhero.

And many more to mention...

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Post by amsula_2018 » 30 Jul 2018, 22:49

I think it is good to tell the readers the things that Toni dislike to make the children think at early age that there are good traits and bad traits. This would make them know the difference between good and bad at a young age. I know that children should enjoy their childhood but I do not see anything wrong if at a young age they can already decipher what is right or wrong.
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Post by Sarah Tariq » 31 Jul 2018, 08:02

Dolor wrote:
30 Jul 2018, 21:51
It would have been better if the author had included Toni's dislikes.

For example, Toni dislikes scattered toys. After playing, he usually put them back and arrange them in their proper places.

Toni dislikes eating vegetables, but because they are good for his health, he eats all the vegetables his mom put on his plate. That makes him a superhero.

And many more to mention...
Exactly, we can add dislikes in many ways just to teach children what is good and what is bad for them. Though it make the a bit complex but more interesting and relatable. So we add it in the next books of this series.
Last edited by Sarah Tariq on 31 Jul 2018, 08:30, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Sarah Tariq » 31 Jul 2018, 08:20

amsula_2018 wrote:
30 Jul 2018, 22:49
I think it is good to tell the readers the things that Toni dislike to make the children think at early age that there are good traits and bad traits. This would make them know the difference between good and bad at a young age. I know that children should enjoy their childhood but I do not see anything wrong if at a young age they can already decipher what is right or wrong.
The book is targeted for the age group 1 to 4. At the age of 4 children can understand well the difference of good and bad. So there is nothing bad if the book includes about right and wrong.
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Post by Ahlily » 31 Jul 2018, 14:49

I think that focusing on Tony's likes is a positive for the book. I think it helps children focus on the positive things in life instead of dwelling on the negative. I think it is important for children to think about the good things in life and focusing on dislikes can sometimes damper their likes. So focusing on "I like the color blue" as opposed to "I don't like the color red" can make it easier for someone to get more joy from seeing blue and less frustration/disgust from seeing red.

I can see the benefit of acknowledging dislikes as well. When someone thinks about something they dislike, they often have a better appreciation when they experience something they like. However, I feel adding that contrast to a children's book can be too complex at a young age for children to understand and grasp.
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Post by kfwilson6 » 31 Jul 2018, 19:14

Ahlily wrote:
31 Jul 2018, 14:49
I think that focusing on Tony's likes is a positive for the book. I think it helps children focus on the positive things in life instead of dwelling on the negative. I think it is important for children to think about the good things in life and focusing on dislikes can sometimes damper their likes. So focusing on "I like the color blue" as opposed to "I don't like the color red" can make it easier for someone to get more joy from seeing blue and less frustration/disgust from seeing red.

I can see the benefit of acknowledging dislikes as well. When someone thinks about something they dislike, they often have a better appreciation when they experience something they like. However, I feel adding that contrast to a children's book can be too complex at a young age for children to understand and grasp.
I think you describe the situation perfectly. I had a hard time explaining exactly what I meant when I said dislikes seem to negative. Your color example is perfect. There is really nothing wrong with liking certain colors and disliking others. But why throw in the word dislike when we can focus on the affirmative words which have a positive connotation?

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Post by Abigail R » 31 Jul 2018, 19:15

Including his dislikes may give kids more things to relate to. This could be a good book to show kids that sometimes we dislike things that are good for us - like veggies, having to put on sunscreen, or going to bed on time! And even superheroes have to go to bed on time!

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Post by kfwilson6 » 31 Jul 2018, 20:35

Dolor wrote:
30 Jul 2018, 21:51
It would have been better if the author had included Toni's dislikes.

For example, Toni dislikes scattered toys. After playing, he usually put them back and arrange them in their proper places.

Toni dislikes eating vegetables, but because they are good for his health, he eats all the vegetables his mom put on his plate. That makes him a superhero.

And many more to mention...
I'm ok with the first type of dislike to encourage keeping things clean. I'm hesitant to have dislikes revolved around things Toni should like. It can be difficult to convince children to do something because they should even when they don't want to. It may be easier to convince them to like something they don't yet care for if their role models like that something.

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Post by ValBookReviews » 01 Aug 2018, 10:53

Hmm... I think far too may have misunderstood the concept of the author's intent.
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Post by cristinaro » 01 Aug 2018, 11:00

Sarah Tariq wrote:
02 Jul 2018, 13:26
The author has included only "likes" about the Toni's character. Do you think she ( the author) should have included "dislikes" as well to give a more thorough look of Toni's personality?
Yes, I think I would have preferred to see Tony not liking certain things too. It would have added more complexity to his character. In that case, we would be talking of a realistic depiction of a ordinary kid with his likes and dislikes and he would have been more relatable for other children.
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Post by Ahlily » 01 Aug 2018, 12:17

kfwilson6 wrote:
31 Jul 2018, 19:14
Ahlily wrote:
31 Jul 2018, 14:49
I think that focusing on Tony's likes is a positive for the book. I think it helps children focus on the positive things in life instead of dwelling on the negative. I think it is important for children to think about the good things in life and focusing on dislikes can sometimes damper their likes. So focusing on "I like the color blue" as opposed to "I don't like the color red" can make it easier for someone to get more joy from seeing blue and less frustration/disgust from seeing red.

I can see the benefit of acknowledging dislikes as well. When someone thinks about something they dislike, they often have a better appreciation when they experience something they like. However, I feel adding that contrast to a children's book can be too complex at a young age for children to understand and grasp.
I think you describe the situation perfectly. I had a hard time explaining exactly what I meant when I said dislikes seem to negative. Your color example is perfect. There is really nothing wrong with liking certain colors and disliking others. But why throw in the word dislike when we can focus on the affirmative words which have a positive connotation?
I love your use of the word connotation (probably one of my favorite words), especially since it describes this instance perfectly. "Dislike" has so much negativity applied to it when there isn't really anything wrong with disliking something. Saying something like "I dislike people using meth," sounds so much more negative than "I like when people don't use meth," simply because of "dislike"'s connotation.
"A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read." -Mark Twain

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Post by Ahlily » 01 Aug 2018, 12:22

cristinaro wrote:
01 Aug 2018, 11:00
Sarah Tariq wrote:
02 Jul 2018, 13:26
The author has included only "likes" about the Toni's character. Do you think she ( the author) should have included "dislikes" as well to give a more thorough look of Toni's personality?
Yes, I think I would have preferred to see Tony not liking certain things too. It would have added more complexity to his character. In that case, we would be talking of a realistic depiction of a ordinary kid with his likes and dislikes and he would have been more relatable for other children.
I understand your point, but what is the intended age group for this book? Adding more layers to a character could negatively impact the reading experience for younger readers. And there is such a negative connotation to disliking something that it could cause an undesirable effect on a child's mood or absorption of the reading material. I think positive reinforcement is far more beneficial at a younger age. Much easier for children to process.
"A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read." -Mark Twain

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Post by lavellan » 01 Aug 2018, 17:30

I think that including Toni's dislikes might have made the book seem too negative. Focusing on Toni's likes allows for the book to have a more positive tone.

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