Toni the Superhero: Subtle Moral Lessons

Use this forum to discuss the July 2018 Book of the Month "Toni the Superhero" by R.D. Base
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Kister Bless
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Re: Toni the Superhero: Subtle Moral Lessons

Post by Kister Bless » 30 Jul 2018, 03:35

The daily chores he does practically, making them seem like fun activities rather than tasks beautifies the book so much. I wish I had a young brother who would want to do chores to be like his superhero. I would be so happy.
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Post by Adediran Israel » 31 Jul 2018, 11:48

Yes, the idea can be incorporated by other authors. Children at a very tender age like this will have the insight into how important the idea of doing chores at home looks like. It will motivate the children to be a better person.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 31 Jul 2018, 19:39

Kister Bless wrote:
30 Jul 2018, 03:35
The daily chores he does practically, making them seem like fun activities rather than tasks beautifies the book so much. I wish I had a young brother who would want to do chores to be like his superhero. I would be so happy.
I always tell my husband that when we have kids we have to always act like fruits are desserts so our children will want them rather than high sugared items. I think the same strategy applies here. If parents are heard mumbling and grumbling about cleaning the house, children are going to be predisposed to not like those activities either. If mom and dad can make those activities seem fun or even like a game, they may end up enjoying chores. We see kids playing with toy kitchens, vacuums, and brooms so why can't we encourage them to continue wanting to be like us. Let them know that cooking can be an enjoyable task.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 31 Jul 2018, 19:39

Adediran Israel wrote:
31 Jul 2018, 11:48
Yes, the idea can be incorporated by other authors. Children at a very tender age like this will have the insight into how important the idea of doing chores at home looks like. It will motivate the children to be a better person.
The subtle lessons in this book are my favorite aspect of it. The lessons aren't too obvious as to be annoying. It would be great if more authors did the same!

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Post by Kdebbie7 » 31 Jul 2018, 20:19

Everyone needs a superhero. Toni is a great role model for children learning to read. The book also promotes the development of good social skills and fosters a spirit of helping others. Even when Toni is not wearing his superhero costume, he does not lose his superhero abilities. He is a superhero because of the way he lives his life. This helps young readers develop healthy self-esteem. A young reader can model this same superhero status as they accomplish their daily tasks.

I found the book useful as it helps children to grow and develop their imaginative creativity at many levels. The illustrations are adorable and they will put a smile on the faces of young readers. It is definitely a must-have in school and children’s libraries, and parents can include it in their child’s personal collection of books at home. I rate teh book 4/5

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Post by Shrabastee » 01 Aug 2018, 02:09

bookowlie wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 10:14
I actually viewed the story differently. I thought Toni was a superhero with superpowers. At the beginning of the story, it states that he is a superhero and shows him flying. I took this statement at face value. In my opinion, the story showed that even superheroes do normal, routine activities. It reminds me of photos where you see a celebrity going to the grocery story without makeup and wearing sweatpants - just like other people. :)
I expected to find some superhero streaks in Toni,especially when the book clearly states him as one. Also, according to the back cover, the book shows what Toni does when 'he is not busy saving the world'. From all this, I really expected at least some glimpse of his superpowers. However, he is not a superhero per se even in the second book. So I finally came to believe that his superpowers lie in his healthy habits, cultural mind, playful nature and lively interactions with his family and friends.

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Post by Shrabastee » 01 Aug 2018, 02:14

Lolababs94 wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 09:59
Did anyone else notice how the author introduced subtle moral lessons?
Your immediate perception of a superhero is someone with super powers. Toni is introduced as a superhero, not just because he has super powers, but also because he helps out in the house, does his chores, etc.

What do you think of this? And, do you think this is something that children authors can adopt in their writing?
I expected at least a few glimpses of the superpowers Toni supposedly possesses. But then his powers probably lie in his healthy habits, helpful nature, cultural activities and lively interactions with his family and friends. All of these make him an ideal character for a young child to follow.
I believe that most, if not all, children's stories come with some morals. It is a good way to inculcate good habits and moral values in a child from a very young and impressionable age.

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Post by ValBookReviews » 01 Aug 2018, 10:14

Yes, I certainly think this is a good concept that other authors can adopt within their own writings.
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Post by lavellan » 01 Aug 2018, 17:23

I think that helping others is a great lesson to teach children. Flashy displays of heroism such as super strength or flying are overdepicted in the media. Demonstrating the value of helping others would encourage children to be an asset to both their families and their communities.

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Post by desantismt_17 » 02 Aug 2018, 11:55

I think it's an interesting way of portraying a "superhero" character. As for authors using it, this is a great way to show kids that everyone is a person just like them, even if that person is rich or famous or has superpowers. I'd wager this lesson is in a lot of children's books already.
You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

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Post by Rosehibbard » 02 Aug 2018, 19:26

I think the moral lessons are great and I honesty think more children writers can use moral lessons in them.

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Post by klwoodford » 02 Aug 2018, 22:42

I personally love the moral lessons. The fact that Toni is a superhero because he is helpful and kind is great. It helps teach kids important lessons. I definitely think it is something that can be adopted by other children's book authors.

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Post by Skyla227 » 05 Aug 2018, 12:53

Tony is a superhero because,he is helpful and also kind. I believe this can be a children's book.

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Post by jcoad » 06 Aug 2018, 14:23

I think it is very clever of the author and parents should be happy as they can encourage their child to be a "superhero" by helping out with certain jobs. Although I think the most important part of any children's book is to want the child to read another book.

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Post by LV2R » 06 Aug 2018, 18:56

I think children authors, by all means, could use stories that include subtle moral values, as well as, attitudes and behaviors. Toni had a great imagination and attitude as he did household chores and played with others. Stories that show healthy-minded children doing normal things are a good foundation for children to follow.

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