Toni the Superhero: Subtle Moral Lessons

Use this forum to discuss the July 2018 Book of the Month "Toni the Superhero" by R.D. Base
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Lolababs94
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Toni the Superhero: Subtle Moral Lessons

Post by Lolababs94 » 01 Jul 2018, 09:59

Did anyone else notice how the author introduced subtle moral lessons?
Your immediate perception of a superhero is someone with super powers. Toni is introduced as a superhero, not just because he has super powers, but also because he helps out in the house, does his chores, etc.

What do you think of this? And, do you think this is something that children authors can adopt in their writing?

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Post by P Reefer » 01 Jul 2018, 10:13

Lolababs94 wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 09:59
Did anyone else notice how the author introduced subtle moral lessons?
Your immediate perception of a superhero is someone with super powers. Toni is introduced as a superhero, not just because he has super powers, but also because he helps out in the house, does his chores, etc.

What do you think of this? And, do you think this is something that children authors can adopt in their writing?
I think it is part of the beauty of this book, the practical and realistic everyday chores he does. If I had a little brother as a little girl who began to help washing dishes because he wanted to be like his superhero I would be thrilled.

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Post by bookowlie » 01 Jul 2018, 10:14

I actually viewed the story differently. I thought Toni was a superhero with superpowers. At the beginning of the story, it states that he is a superhero and shows him flying. I took this statement at face value. In my opinion, the story showed that even superheroes do normal, routine activities. It reminds me of photos where you see a celebrity going to the grocery story without makeup and wearing sweatpants - just like other people. :)
"The best way out is always through" - Robert Frost

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Post by Lolababs94 » 01 Jul 2018, 10:49

bookowlie wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 10:14
I actually viewed the story differently. I thought Toni was a superhero with superpowers. At the beginning of the story, it states that he is a superhero and shows him flying. I took this statement at face value. In my opinion, the story showed that even superheroes do normal, routine activities. It reminds me of photos where you see a celebrity going to the grocery story without makeup and wearing sweatpants - just like other people. :)
That's so true! I didn't think from that perspective...very true; superheroes do have "normal" lives; their normal alter egos :D

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Post by Lolababs94 » 01 Jul 2018, 10:53

Bookmermaid wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 10:13
Lolababs94 wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 09:59
Did anyone else notice how the author introduced subtle moral lessons?
Your immediate perception of a superhero is someone with super powers. Toni is introduced as a superhero, not just because he has super powers, but also because he helps out in the house, does his chores, etc.

What do you think of this? And, do you think this is something that children authors can adopt in their writing?
I think it is part of the beauty of this book, the practical and realistic everyday chores he does. If I had a little brother as a little girl who began to help washing dishes because he wanted to be like his superhero I would be thrilled.
I absolutely agree with you! Unfortunately, none of my brothers read this book when they were younger! :lol:

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Post by NnWillsons » 01 Jul 2018, 12:10

bookowlie wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 10:14
I actually viewed the story differently. I thought Toni was a superhero with superpowers. At the beginning of the story, it states that he is a superhero and shows him flying. I took this statement at face value. In my opinion, the story showed that even superheroes do normal, routine activities. It reminds me of photos where you see a celebrity going to the grocery story without makeup and wearing sweatpants - just like other people. :)
Right! And I think it’s even better that way because it teaches kids that you’re never too important or to busy to do things like help clean up, for example.
“We believe in ordinary acts of bravery in the courage that drives one person to stand up for another.”

-Dauntless Manifesto

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Post by palilogy » 01 Jul 2018, 13:36

It comes down to opinion and semantics - in the end I don't think it matters too much what label people place upon Toni.
In my opinion it matters more how the character views himself.
I wish I could have seen more of him and his morality.

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Post by Cristal2408 » 01 Jul 2018, 14:50

Lolababs94 wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 09:59
Did anyone else notice how the author introduced subtle moral lessons?
Your immediate perception of a superhero is someone with super powers. Toni is introduced as a superhero, not just because he has super powers, but also because he helps out in the house, does his chores, etc.

What do you think of this? And, do you think this is something that children authors can adopt in their writing?
This is actually my favorite thing about the book. Right now, this is something schools are trying to teach in high schools, but if small children can understand it, they should learn it since they are small.
It's no use to go back to yesterday... I was a different person then.---Lewis Carrol from Alice in Wonderland

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Post by bclayton13 » 01 Jul 2018, 17:42

Bookmermaid wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 10:13
Lolababs94 wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 09:59
Did anyone else notice how the author introduced subtle moral lessons?
Your immediate perception of a superhero is someone with super powers. Toni is introduced as a superhero, not just because he has super powers, but also because he helps out in the house, does his chores, etc.

What do you think of this? And, do you think this is something that children authors can adopt in their writing?
I think it is part of the beauty of this book, the practical and realistic everyday chores he does. If I had a little brother as a little girl who began to help washing dishes because he wanted to be like his superhero I would be thrilled.
I agree completely! The implication is that if you don't help out then you can't be like Toni, which I would have loved since my brother never really learned how to help around the house.

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Post by kfwilson6 » 01 Jul 2018, 20:55

I love the subtle lessons. I think the wonder of Toni is that he will make chores seem like fun activities rather than tasks one should want to hurry through because they aren't enjoyable.

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Post by holsam_87 » 01 Jul 2018, 21:09

kfwilson6 wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 20:55
I love the subtle lessons. I think the wonder of Toni is that he will make chores seem like fun activities rather than tasks one should want to hurry through because they aren't enjoyable.
I agree with this completely. It will correlate to school as well. In the district that I work at, if kids are seen doing good things, then they receive a slip known as a "gold dog." They can then put their slips in a box to be drawn for a prize. Whole class incentives are called "red dogs" which allow classes to get a fun activity like a movie or an ice cream party.
Samantha Holtsclaw

“We’ve all got both light and dark inside us. What matters is the part we choose to act on. That’s who we really are.”

—J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix

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Post by Lolababs94 » 01 Jul 2018, 21:29

kfwilson6 wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 20:55
I love the subtle lessons. I think the wonder of Toni is that he will make chores seem like fun activities rather than tasks one should want to hurry through because they aren't enjoyable.
Absolutely!!! I think it's something that should be encouraged in children as well as cartoons. When chores can be made into fun activities, it might reduce the antagonism towards chores. As the song goes, "Just a spoonful of dugar helps the medicine go down, in the most delightful way!" :D

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Post by Lolababs94 » 01 Jul 2018, 21:31

holsam_87 wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 21:09
kfwilson6 wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 20:55
I love the subtle lessons. I think the wonder of Toni is that he will make chores seem like fun activities rather than tasks one should want to hurry through because they aren't enjoyable.
I agree with this completely. It will correlate to school as well. In the district that I work at, if kids are seen doing good things, then they receive a slip known as a "gold dog." They can then put their slips in a box to be drawn for a prize. Whole class incentives are called "red dogs" which allow classes to get a fun activity like a movie or an ice cream party.
Wow!!! That is very encouraging and constructive! :clap:

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Post by Lolababs94 » 01 Jul 2018, 21:34

NnWillsons wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 12:10
bookowlie wrote:
01 Jul 2018, 10:14
I actually viewed the story differently. I thought Toni was a superhero with superpowers. At the beginning of the story, it states that he is a superhero and shows him flying. I took this statement at face value. In my opinion, the story showed that even superheroes do normal, routine activities. It reminds me of photos where you see a celebrity going to the grocery story without makeup and wearing sweatpants - just like other people. :)
Right! And I think it’s even better that way because it teaches kids that you’re never too important or to busy to do things like help clean up, for example.
That's a very important lesson...to never be too busy to help out. Deinitely a lesson easier learnt as younger children.

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Post by KitabuKizuri » 01 Jul 2018, 23:55

I think it is a good approach with a subtle touch. A child would want to emulate a hero, so the author uses that to positively influence the young mind.

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