20 Similarities Between End of the Last Great Kingdom and Every Other Fantasy Book Written

Use this forum to discuss the December 2017 Book of the Month, End of the Last Great Kingdom by Victor Rose.
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ericahs
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Re: 20 Similarities Between End of the Last Great Kingdom and Every Other Fantasy Book Written

Post by ericahs » 26 Feb 2018, 20:24

While reading, I kept thinking of Name of the Wind. The similarities are very very striking. I haven't finished so I'm on the fence about whether he's just borrowing from the greats, as most writers do, or kind of falling into the noise if that makes sense.

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Post by ericahs » 27 Feb 2018, 11:18

NL Hartje wrote:
31 Jan 2018, 21:30
Emie Cuevas wrote:
30 Jan 2018, 22:26
Not sure what you are getting at. Except that is is so hard to come up with a totally new concept. It sounds like the author is a well read fan of the genre. Keep the books coming.
Ha, thanks for your comment! I'm not certain I was "getting at" anything aside from continuing a discussion about the book. As I mentioned in my review, I enjoyed the similarities and acknowledged that most of fantasy is just a repeat of other tried-and-true ideas. I do think the author would have done himself a great justice by expanding more on the ideas in his book that WERE original because I enjoyed them and so noted in my review:)
I agree with you. I think the author has a lot of unique ideas, and I kind of wish he used those to complicate or enrich the older conventions of the genre.
The ships hung in the sky in much the same way that bricks don’t.- Douglas Adams

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Post by Bettercallyourbookie » 31 Mar 2018, 21:28

kandscreeley wrote:
23 Jan 2018, 09:55
I do see your point in several of these. I'm not sure that necessarily means he was copying or that it's a bad story. I think most of them are something that are just common in fantasy novels. The split into 7 thing, though, is quite interesting...
It is interesting, but 7 is a powerful number in many mythologies. For one, 7 is an odd number, and used to be common for quests in Greek stories. In the myth of Atlas, his 7 daughters are the Hesperides. It took Odysseus 7 days to wash ashore on Ogygia, where Calypso kept him for 7 years. In Egyptian mythology, a woman who pissed Isis off was punished by 7 scorpions. In the Abrahamic religions, it took God 7 days to create the universe, and the end of the world is signaled by the breaking of 7 seals, blowing of 7 trumpets, and 7 angels. Anyone who harms Cain, who is cursed to be a wanderer among the Earth will have that returned 7fold.

7 has shown up everywhere for a long time, and the mythology surrounding it is interesting, but you're right. It's common mythology and commonly shows up in fantasy novels as a result.

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Post by NL Hartje » 31 Mar 2018, 23:50

Bettercallyourbookie wrote:
31 Mar 2018, 21:28
kandscreeley wrote:
23 Jan 2018, 09:55
I do see your point in several of these. I'm not sure that necessarily means he was copying or that it's a bad story. I think most of them are something that are just common in fantasy novels. The split into 7 thing, though, is quite interesting...
It is interesting, but 7 is a powerful number in many mythologies. For one, 7 is an odd number, and used to be common for quests in Greek stories. In the myth of Atlas, his 7 daughters are the Hesperides. It took Odysseus 7 days to wash ashore on Ogygia, where Calypso kept him for 7 years. In Egyptian mythology, a woman who pissed Isis off was punished by 7 scorpions. In the Abrahamic religions, it took God 7 days to create the universe, and the end of the world is signaled by the breaking of 7 seals, blowing of 7 trumpets, and 7 angels. Anyone who harms Cain, who is cursed to be a wanderer among the Earth will have that returned 7fold.

7 has shown up everywhere for a long time, and the mythology surrounding it is interesting, but you're right. It's common mythology and commonly shows up in fantasy novels as a result.
Wow, mind blown! You just took this to an entirely new level! I love all of this info! Thank you for reading and having fun with us!
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Post by angiejack456 » 06 Feb 2019, 12:12

I haven't read the book but found your list interesting. I read once that all fantasy is just a rewrite of Lord of the Rings, and I find this surprisingly true. I think the real genius in writing occurs when we are introduced to worlds and ideas never yet explored!

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Post by NL Hartje » 09 Feb 2019, 10:11

angiejack456 wrote:
06 Feb 2019, 12:12
. I think the real genius in writing occurs when we are introduced to worlds and ideas never yet explored!
Agreed; easier said than done, though, I’m sure 😬
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Post by Writerly Ambitions » 12 Mar 2019, 14:52

I noticed the same trend of familiar tropes in this novel. I don’t think the use of familiar tropes will necessarily hinder any book because in general tropes are easily recognizable patterns for a reason. They’re compelling for at least some category of people. However, it heavily depends on how the author uses those tropes. For instance, if the author recognizes the trope as something very often done, he or she can subvert it and breathe life back into that trope. However, if the author doesn’t write the trope well or compellingly (or if she simply copies another book’s plot), then all the use of tropes will do is remind readers of works with similar story aspects and make them wish they were reading the subjectively better novel. In extreme cases, there could be plagiarism issues.

So I would say that tropes should be used both carefully and consciously. Otherwise it might detract from a story.

Thanks for posting the interesting topic!

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Post by Renu G » 21 Mar 2019, 08:41

I tried to compare it with the Chronicles of Narnia. The latter has something to teach children but the former seems too confusing.

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Post by Brandy C » 12 Apr 2019, 17:08

I see the similarities and its a very thorough list. I also saw some comparison to the Divergent Series. The distinction in the classifications or factions and the trial reminded me of the series. I feel Rose easily drew from other famous fantasy novels. My first thought when reading was Harry Potter of course. After reading a couple of chapters, I saw similarities in other fantasy novels. It didn't take away from the story for me but I did find myself comparing it to other novels. The problem with comparing one with the other is you’re often left wanting more! Great question and thorough comparisons.
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