Books with unique writing style

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Eanderson531
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Books with unique writing style

Post by Eanderson531 » 18 Mar 2019, 03:26

I am looking for some uniquely written books. For example styles like House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski or Replica by Lauren Oliver. With both of these books I very much enjoyed that the author presented a new way to interact with the text. However, I have struggled to find any other books written in these unique styles. Any help would be appreciated.

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Post by EllieLieberman » 18 Mar 2019, 19:45

I just finished reading The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner. The style is very unique. It is very stream-of-consciousness that blurs the past and the present.
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess is written entirely in made-up slang. The first couple of pages can be a head scratcher until you get used to the language, and by the end of the book you can practically speak Nadsat.
Ellen Hopkins also has a very unique style. Her books are written like poetry/verse, but it tells a story. Often the layout of the words have an affect on the reading, as well, almost like an illustration.

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Post by ChaosofaMadHatter » 16 Apr 2019, 13:56

If you're interested in fantasy, The Broken Earth has a complex writing style that plays heavily into the plot line, so I don't want to reveal too much. As is though, the style itself leads into a massive plot point that makes it very effective.

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S Mishra
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Post by S Mishra » 27 May 2019, 21:54

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak is narrated by Death who describes the three times he met the Protagonist when someone near her died...

It's set during WW2 in Nazi Germany and is really beautifully written

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Cardui
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Post by Cardui » 06 Jun 2019, 19:18

S Mishra wrote:
27 May 2019, 21:54
The Book Thief by Markus Zusak is narrated by Death who describes the three times he met the Protagonist when someone near her died...

It's set during WW2 in Nazi Germany and is really beautifully written
I was going to suggest this one as well.

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Post by melel_jo » 07 Jun 2019, 13:44

Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf is written like a stream of consciousness.

Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy evolves with the character - like the violence is described in less detail as the main character becomes desensitized to it.
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Post by Sinclairess » 04 Jul 2019, 14:39

Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes. The writing is "improper" and written by someone who has a learning disorder. He is offered to be a test subject and agrees to boost his intelligence, because he is very aware of his state. A very thoughtful, touching read. You will cry (I did). :crying-yellow:
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Sinclairess
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Post by Sinclairess » 04 Jul 2019, 14:41

melel_jo wrote:
07 Jun 2019, 13:44
Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf is written like a stream of consciousness.

Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy evolves with the character - like the violence is described in less detail as the main character becomes desensitized to it.
You reminded me that I have a copy of Mrs. Dalloway! Thank you, I love the stream of consciousness style.
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Post by Czarina Grace » 04 Jul 2019, 23:13

Nevernight by Jay Kristoff. Steampunk, historical and high fantasy genre. From what I've seen in other discussions, half the readers hate it. The other half likes it. Personally, what I find absolutely intriguing is that he has a very unique writing style. It has a storytelling feel, with a lot of reflection, and occasionally breaking the fourth wall. So sometimes, there are specific statements with the author talking to his reader.
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Post by esp1975 » 17 Jul 2019, 15:19

Pattern Recognition by William Gibson is written in first person, present tense.

Princes of the Air by John M Ford tells the story of a group of friends, but you only see them at major points in their lives when they are (almost) all together

Really, anything by Gene Wolfe, but especially Soldier of the Mist, Soldier of Arete, and Soldier of Sidon - the book is told from the point of view of a character with a traumatic brain injury that makes him a completely unreliable narrator

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Post by esp1975 » 17 Jul 2019, 15:21

Also, The Phoenix Guards (and following books) by Steven Brust - written in the style of Alexandre Dumas taken to the extreme.

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Post by Thebookwasbetter12 » 18 Jul 2019, 10:22

If you are looking for a book with a unique writing style, A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket is the way to go! This series, comprised of thirteen (13) separate novels, is about how three orphans have to combat a nefarious count who’s after their mountainous inheritance. Though this series was written for young adults, there is no doubt that many adults would find it riveting, and ultimately humorous.

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Post by corinaelena » 18 Aug 2019, 14:22

Anything by Haruki Murakami is really special.

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Post by NetMassimo » 19 Aug 2019, 01:53

The Jean le Flambeur's trilogy by Hannu Rajaniemi has a unique writing style because it's set in a far future with very advanced technologies that affect the characters and the story in different ways in the novels and the author tried to show that also through his style so it's a case where style is part of the substance.
Ciao :)
Massimo

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Post by Ben Moore » 27 Aug 2019, 07:11

Lincoln In The Bardo by George Saunders is one of the most uniquely written books I’ve read! It’s written using lots of quotations from both real and fictional historical sources and the action is generally described in a very strange style. It’s quite hard to explain but it’s truly excellent.

It follows Abraham Lincoln’s son after his death as he finds himself in the Bardo, a sort of purgatorial place. Abraham Lincoln famously visited his son’s crypt several times and this is worked into the story.
'All bad poetry springs from genuine feeling' - Oscar Wilde
'Am reading more Oscar Wilde. What a tiresome, affected sod' - Noël Coward

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